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Dudney Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'dudney'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 14 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Wandsworth Burials (1668)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1668)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
Voters in Pevensey rape, Sussex (1774)
A poll of freeholders to elect two knights of the shire to represent the county of Sussex was taken at Chichester in 1774. This poll book lists each voter's full name; abode; where the freehold lay and of what it consisted (b., barn; f., farm; g., garden; h., house; l., land; m., mill; o., orchard; r., rectory; w. sh., workshop); and the name of the occupier (if any) (often surname only); with dashes in the right-hand columns indicating votes for the candidates, Lord George Henry Lennox, sir Thomas Spencer Wilson and sir James Peachey. The franchise was limited to freeholders of 40 shillings per annum and more. The sample scan shows part of Chichester rape. The rape of Pevensey included East Grinstead, Hailsham and Seaford and the surrounding countryside.

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Voters in Pevensey rape, Sussex
 (1774)
Bankrupts' Estates (1848)
Bankrupts' estates for England and Wales vested in assignees: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Bankrupts' Estates
 (1848)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Algiers, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Encounter (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and the Pekin clasp, for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Encounter
 (1856-1860)
Brewers in Sussex (1874)
Henry Downes Miles compiled this London and Suburban Licensed Victuallers', Hotel and Tavern Keepers' Directory, which also had sections listings brewers, maltsters, hop factors, distillers and rectifiers of the United Kingdom.

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Brewers in Sussex
 (1874)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1886)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, April to June 1886

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1886)
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