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Doy Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'doy'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 36 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Devon and Cornwall clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1370-1382)
Ordinations to first tonsure, acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop Thomas de Brantyngham of Exeter. Exeter diocese covered the counties of Cornwall and Devon. Some of these clerks would go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars ('religious') are bracketed separately as such.

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Devon and Cornwall clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1370-1382)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1380-1389)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 3rd to the 13th years of king Richard II.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1380-1389)
The English in France (1419-1420)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 7th year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1419 to 20 March 1420) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1419-1420)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1735)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 5 April to 31 December 1735

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1735)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Norfolk (1802)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/70

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Masters of apprentices registered in Norfolk
 (1802)
Voters in the Eastern Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Welborne, near East Dereham (1832)
Under the Reform Act of 1832, the County of Norfolk was allotted four Members of Parliament, being two Knights of the Shire for the Eastern Division and two for the Western. The Eastern Division included the hundreds of Blofield, Clavering, Depwade, Diss, Earsham, North Erpingham, South Erpingham, Eynsford, East Flegg, West Flegg, Forehoe, Happing, Henstead, Humbleyard, Loddon, Taverham, Tunstead and Walsham. The franchise was available to freeholders worth 40s a year or over; copyholders and long leaseholders of 10 or more; short leaseholders and tenants of 50 or more: but limited to adult males. Voting took place on 20 and 21 December 1832. This poll book lists the voters for each parish, with the votes cast. Voting was not compulsory, and non-voters are not listed. Each voter had two votes: the votes are indicated in the columns C. (Lord Henry Cholmondeley, 2852); P. (Nathaniel William Peach, 2960); K. (Hon. George Keppel, 3261); and W. (William Howe Windham, 3304). The voters were not necessarily resident in the parish, but derived their franchise from the land there; so some of the names have addresses outside the parish. After the name there may appear the abbreviations cop. for copyholder; oc. for occupier; or le. for leaseholder: the rest are freeholders or annuitants.

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Voters in the Eastern Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Welborne, near East Dereham
 (1832)
Voters in the Western Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Beetley (1837)
Under the Reform Act of 1832, the County of Norfolk was allotted four Members of Parliament, being two Knights of the Shire for the Eastern Division and two for the Western. The Western Division included the hundreds of Brothercross, Clackclose, Freebridge Lynn, Freebridge Marshland, Gallow, North Greenhoe, South Greenhow, Grimshoe, Guiltcross, Holt, Launditch, Mitford, Shropham, Smithdon and Wayland. Polling in 1837 took place at Swaffham, Downham, Fakenham, Lynn Regis, Thetford and East Dereham. The franchise was available to freeholders worth 40s a year or over; copyholders and long leaseholders of 10 or more; short leaseholders and tenants of 50 or more: but limited to adult males. Voting took place on 1 and 2 August 1837. This poll book lists the voters for each parish, with the votes cast. Each voter had two votes: the votes are indicated in the columns F. (Sir William Henry Browne Folkes, 2838); A. (Sir Jacob Astley, 2713); B. (William Bagge, 3178); and C. (William Lyde Wiggett Chute, 2877). The voters were not necessarily resident in the parish, but derived their franchise from the land there; so some of the names have addresses outside the parish, not a few living in different counties. Not everyone voted, but everyone with a vote was listed in the poll book: persons who qualified for voting in two parishes (but nevertheless had just the one vote per person) are noted as such.

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Voters in the Western Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Beetley
 (1837)
Voters in the Western Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Little Fransham (1837)
Under the Reform Act of 1832, the County of Norfolk was allotted four Members of Parliament, being two Knights of the Shire for the Eastern Division and two for the Western. The Western Division included the hundreds of Brothercross, Clackclose, Freebridge Lynn, Freebridge Marshland, Gallow, North Greenhoe, South Greenhow, Grimshoe, Guiltcross, Holt, Launditch, Mitford, Shropham, Smithdon and Wayland. Polling in 1837 took place at Swaffham, Downham, Fakenham, Lynn Regis, Thetford and East Dereham. The franchise was available to freeholders worth 40s a year or over; copyholders and long leaseholders of 10 or more; short leaseholders and tenants of 50 or more: but limited to adult males. Voting took place on 1 and 2 August 1837. This poll book lists the voters for each parish, with the votes cast. Each voter had two votes: the votes are indicated in the columns F. (Sir William Henry Browne Folkes, 2838); A. (Sir Jacob Astley, 2713); B. (William Bagge, 3178); and C. (William Lyde Wiggett Chute, 2877). The voters were not necessarily resident in the parish, but derived their franchise from the land there; so some of the names have addresses outside the parish, not a few living in different counties. Not everyone voted, but everyone with a vote was listed in the poll book: persons who qualified for voting in two parishes (but nevertheless had just the one vote per person) are noted as such.

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Voters in the Western Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Little Fransham
 (1837)
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