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Doss Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'doss'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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British in India and Ceylon, China and Australasia (1836)
Births, marriages and deaths, civil, ecclesiastical and military promotions, furloughs, reports of shipping to and from England and the East, with passenger lists, and news items published in the Asiatic Journal

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British in India and Ceylon, China and Australasia
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.

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London Policemen
Soldiers' Balances Unclaimed (1882)
The War Office, under 'The Regimental Debts Act, 1863' compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1882 new lists CXLI to CL relating to recent deaths were issued, as well as republications of lists XCI to CL from previous years showing details of balances still remaining unclaimed.

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Soldiers' Balances Unclaimed
Indians in the Indian Empire (1895)
Thacker's Indian Directory lists prominent natives of the cities of Calcutta, Bombay and Madras, and throughout the Indian Empire. Profession is usually stated, and an address - a station, or for Calcutta a full address.

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Indians in the Indian Empire
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1900)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1900.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
Barristers (1918)
The Law List for 1918 includes this 'List of Counsel, Special Pleaders, and Conveyancers at the Bar'. Each name is given in full, surname first; then the name of the Inn of Court as an abbreviation (G., Gray's Inn; I., Inner Temple; L., Lincoln's Inn; M., Middle Temple; and D. C. for Doctors' Commons) and date at which called to the bar. Barristers in practice are usually furnished with an address, and there are some abbreviated references to judicial awards and appointments. An asterisk signifies an Equity Draughtsman and Conveyancer.

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Anglican clergy (1930)
Crockford's Clerical Directory listed all Anglican clergy in the British Isles, India, the colonies, Europe, Asia and South America. The 59th annual issue, for 1930, is based on returns from all the individuals listed. The details given are: name (surname first, in capitals) in bold, prefixed by an asterisk in the case of university electors, and by a dagger whether the return had not been made, or it had been imperfectly filled up; name of theological college and/or university, and degrees, with years; a bold d followed by year and diocese signifies date of ordination as deacon and by which bishop; then a bold p, similarly for ordination as priest; posts (C: curate; I: incumbent; V; vicar; R: rector) with parishes and years; address; telephone number; and lists of books &c. where appropriate. In the case of the man then holding an English, Irish, Scottish or Welsh benefice, additional details are given - a bold P signifies the patron of the advowson; then the income, with items such as Q. A. B. (Queen Anne's Bounty), Eccles(iastical) Comm(issioners), Fees, e. o. (Easter Offerings), Pew Rents, T(ithe) R(ent) C(harge), Gl(ebe), &c.

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Anglican clergy
Doctors trained in Britain or Ireland but living abroad (1948)
The Medical Directory was split into several sections. The Practitioners Resident Abroad section covered all medical practitioners who, having qualified in Britain or Ireland, were living abroad. Each year a schedule was sent to each doctor to be returned to the publishers, so as to keep the directory up to date. In the directory the doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications. Inclusion of names in the list did not imply a right to practise in the country of residence.

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Doctors trained in Britain or Ireland but living abroad
Chemists (1950)
The Royal Institute of Chemistry was founded in 1877, and was open only to British subjects (and also, in due course, to citizens of the newly-created Republic of Ireland). Associates of the institute (A. R. I. C.) qualified either by studying chemistry, physics, mathematics and an optional science for the institute's examination (which insisted on a high standard of practical laboratory efficiency); or by obtaining good honours degrees or equivalent qualifications, with chemistry as principal subject, and having undergone training in allied sciences. Associates of at least three years' standing could then be admitted to the Fellowship (F. R. I. C.) either by taking a further examination in a special branch of chemistry, or by submitting the results of work or evidence of experience sufficient to justify the Council in granting exemption from such further examination. This register of fellows and associates, correct to 31 August 1950, contains 11,545 names, arranged alphabetically, surname first (in capitals), with qualifications, current address, telephone number, and (in italics) a brief description of present post in the chemical industry. Finally, year of admission as associate (A.) (and, where appropriate, fellow (F.) is given on the right-hand side. With this may appear the notation (x) for a fellow of the Chemical Society, (y) for a member of the Society of Chemical Industry, or (z) for a joint subscriber to all three chartered bodies.

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