Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Dorp Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'dorp'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

Buy all
Get all 9 records to view, to save and print for £44.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1305-1342)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement V, John XXII and Benedict XII. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement V was consecrated and crowned 14 November 1305 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); John XXII was crowned 5 September 1316; Benedict XII 8 January 1335 and died 25 April 1342. From 1309 onwards the papacy was in exile at Avignon. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss from Regesta lii to cxxxvi, and published in 1895. Bliss remarked that 'although the writing of the Papal Registers of the 14th century is clearer than that of many contemporary English MSS., the entries in them were for the most part founded upon petitions or letters from different countries, and the scribes in the Papal Chancery must have experienced even greater difficulty in copying English proper names than English students experience nowadays in reading the early Chancery Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. Not having local or personal knowledge, they constantly misread doubtful letters.'

DORP. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1305-1342)
The English in Holland and Flanders (1586-1587)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were at this period attempting to throw off the Spanish yoke, and Elizabeth sent considerable forces to their aid: the English leader, Robert Dudley earl of Leicester, was offered the governorship of the States General. The papers relating to Holland and Flanders in the State Papers Foreign are so voluminous in consequence, that a separate calendar was edited by Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, this volume, covering June 1586 to March 1587, being published in 1927.

DORP. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
The English in Holland and Flanders
 (1586-1587)
The English in Holland and Flanders (1588)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were at this period attempting to throw off the Spanish yoke, and Elizabeth sent considerable forces to their aid. The papers relating to Holland and Flanders in the State Papers Foreign are so voluminous in consequence, that a separate calendar was edited by Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, this volume, covering January to June 1588, being published in 1931.

DORP. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
The English in Holland and Flanders
 (1588)
Official Papers (1694-1695)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Here we have the period from January 1694 to June 1695.

DORP. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1694-1695)
Masters of Merchantmen (1822)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Bk, barque; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), patent felt (P F), copper fastened (c f), copper bolted (c b), or copper repaired (C rp) sometimes with a date, such as (18)18. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1822, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repair; len. lengthened; lrp. large repair; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; Srprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; Hk., hackmetack; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel; W. O., white oak. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was American property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; a few were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; Hn, Harrington; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Mt., Maryport; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Pl., Plymouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Wo., Workington; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second) and its stores (1, first; 2, second) and the year of survey, e. g. 09 for 1809, or, if surveyed during 1821, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the main list and the supplement.

DORP. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Merchantmen
 (1822)
Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales (1849)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of dissolutions of partnerships gazetted in England and Wales. The names of the partners are given in full, surnames in capitals, followed by trade and address, and date of the end of the partnership. Each entry usually ends with the phrase 'Debts by ...', indicating which partner intended to continue, and resume the responsibilities of, the business. This is the index to the names of the partners, from the issues from January to December 1849.

DORP. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales
 (1849)
Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors (1849)
Principal creditors petitioning to force a bankruptcy (but often close relatives of the bankrupt helping to protect his assets): and solicitors

DORP. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors
 (1849)
London Telephone Subscribers (1939)
The London telephone directory lists subscribers alphabetically by surname and then by christian name or initials, with their postal address and telephone number. This is the L to Z directory issued in May 1939, but also contains some names from earlier in the alphabet, for instance in the separate section for midwives. The London telephone districts comprised not only the city centre, but also the very extensive suburbs in the Home Counties (Essex, Kent, Surrey and Middlesex).

DORP. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London Telephone Subscribers
 (1939)
Student Electrical Engineers (Student I. E. E.) (1939)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. The list of members, corrected to 1 September 1939, gives the names and addresses of the various grades of members. Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.) were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. Then there are the Associates (Associate I. E. E.), Companions (Companion I. E. E.), Graduates (Graduate I. E. E.) and Students (Student I. E. E.). The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining that grade; and for the higher grades the year of each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931).

DORP. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Student Electrical Engineers (Student I. E. E.)
 (1939)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.