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Donough Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'donough'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Official Papers (1697)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1697)
British administration in North America (1755-1776)
The papers of the 2nd Earl of Dartmouth, who served as Secretary of State for the American Department, contain correspondence relating to North America and the West Indies. They include some material earlier than 1755.

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British administration in North America
 (1755-1776)
Masters of Merchantmen (1785)
The Daily Universal Register of April 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Plymouth, Whitby, Cowes, Falmouth, Bristol and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Creek(e), in the Downs, off the Lizard, off Scilly, off the Start, in Studland Bay, off Whitby, off the Wight, at Aberdeen, Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Barcelona, Bayonne, Belfast, Bombay, Bonny, Bordeaux, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Carlingford, Cartagena, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Galway, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hamburg, Havre de Grace, Hull, Jersey, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lochryan, Malaga, Marseilles, Montserrat, Nantes, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Oporto, Ostend, Penzance, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Eustatia, St John's, St Kitts, St Vincents, Scarborough, Scilly, Seville, Southampton, Stangate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Venice, Waterford, Weymouth, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, North Carolina, Philadelphia, South Carolina and Virginia; and Coast Lists made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1785)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.

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London Policemen
 (1830-1842)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1847)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. July to December 1847

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1847)
Masters and Mates of Merchantmen: Certificates of Competency (1857)
The Mercantile Navy List and Annual Appendage to the Commercial Code of Signals for All Nations, edited by J. H. Brown, was published By Authority in 1857. It includes this full list of 'Masters and Mates who have passed their examination and obtained Certificates of Competency', from number 1 to number 15816, except for those whose certificates had been cancelled. The first column gives the number of certificate; the second column full name, surname first (an asterisk before the name denotes those who are found qualified to act in fore and aft-rigged vessels only; two vertical lines denotes in North Wales fishery only; a double dagger, passed the examination in steam; and a dagger refers to honorary testimonials, details of which are printed at the end of the section. A B C D are the distinguishing letters for the four classes of Meteorological Observers); third column, class examined (1 ex, 1, 2 and 3 denote First Extra, First, Second and Third Class Master's Certificate, granted under the Voluntary Examination, by Order in Council dated August 1845; Ex C, Master Extra; O C, Master Ordinary; 1 M, First Mate; O M, Only Mate; 2 M, Second Mate; L. R. N., Lieutenant Royal Navy; M. R. N., Master Royal Navy; E. I. C., East India Company; M. I. N., Master Indian Navy.); fourth column, year of certificate (where there are two dots, this is to represent a 'ditto' to the year next above); fifth column, Examining Board (Aberdeen, Belfast, Bristol, Cork, Dublin, Dundee, Glasgow, Greenock, Hull, Leith, Liverpool, London, Newcastle, Plymouth, Shields or Sunderland).

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Masters and Mates of Merchantmen: Certificates of Competency
 (1857)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Sans Pareil (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Sans Pareil
 (1856-1860)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: West Ham (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: West Ham
 (1861)
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