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Docket Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'docket'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 4 records (displaying 1 to 4): 

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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury (1214-1439)
Christopher Wordsworth, Master of the Hospital of St Nicholas in Salisbury, Wiltshire, published an edition of the 15th-century cartulary of that foundation in 1902. While transcribing the text, he interspersed it with notes and lists from his own researches so as to provide a general history of the hospital, and some of the material dates from much later than 1500, and relates to those institutions which he regarded as daughter institutions or offshoots of the hospital. There are later additions to the cartulary through to 1639, and records of the Chapel of St John Baptist on the Isle, the Scotist College of St Nicholas de Vaux (Valle Scholarium), and the collegiate church of St Edmund, Salisbury. There is also a calendar of records belonging to the hospital. The cartulary itself is a quarto codex of 80 leaves, copying charters of bequests to the hospital, and in these the main persons to appear are the benefactors, the witnesses, and occasionally the names of tenants, occupiers of adjoining tenements, and members of the hospital clergy. The cartulary is in six geographical sections: I, Box, Wyvelesford and Manningford Bohun; II, Broad Hinton; III, Fyssherton (Fisherton Aucher or Anger); IV, East and West Harnham; V, Salisbury; and VI, Gerardeston (Gurston in Broadchalke).

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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury
 (1214-1439)
London funerals and other news (1550-1563)
Henry Machyn was a citizen and merchant-taylor of London. He had a professional interest in the lavish funerals of his fellow citizens, and in October 1550 started a note book giving brief details of these occasions. Soon he added political news, and (in an age before newspapers) he had a journalist's eye for accidents, hangings, the preachings and suppression of heretics, and the fortunes and misfortunes of dissidents. He lived in interesting times; the early death of Edward VI; the failed attempt to install Jane on the throne; the succession of queen Mary, and a lurch towards Catholicism; her marriage to Philip of Spain; her death, and the accession of queen Elizabeth. Machyn's humble journal, written for his own amusement and with a resolute indifference to orthography, became in its time an important historical source, used by Strype, and then edited by John Gough Nichols for the Camden Society and published in 1848.

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London funerals and other news
 (1550-1563)
Traders in Canterbury (1392-1592)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, transcribed and privately printed in 1904 the lists of the Intrantes - those persons, not being free of the city, who paid the annual fine to trade - for the period 1392 to 1592. The names are arranged by ward (Burgate, Newyngate, Westgate, Worgate and Northgate, and give full name, (sometimes) occupation, and fee paid.

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Traders in Canterbury
 (1392-1592)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1737)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1737

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1737)
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