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Deneby Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'deneby'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Patent Rolls: entries for Yorkshire (1275-1276)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 4th year of king Edward I [20 November 1275 to 19 November 1276], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Yorkshire
 (1275-1276)
Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire (1266-1279)
The register of archbishop Walter Giffard of York, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, was edited by William Brown for the Surtees Society and published in 1904. The ancient diocese of York covered all of Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, as well as Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Hexhamshire in Northumberland. But there are few entries relating to the archdeaconry of Richmond, and few about the peculiar jurisdictions of Southwell, Ripon, Beverley and Hexham. The dioceses of Carlisle and Durham, both in the province of York, are hardly mentioned. Archbishop Giffard spent much of his pontificate away from his diocese, and the register has gaps: but at least it survives, unlike those for his immediate predecessors, Sewall de Boville (1256-1258) and Godfrey de Ludham (1258-1264). Moreover, there are ordination lists (pages 187 to 198) of acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests ordained in 1267 to 1274. These usually give full name, and indicate whether the man was 'religious' (a monk or friar), and whether his 'title' (sponsorship) arose from his own patrimony, but 'title' is not usually otherwise specified.

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire
 (1266-1279)
Lancashire Assizes (1202-1285)
All the surviving records of the assizes held by the royal justices in eyre (itinerant) in Lancashire during this period were extracted by colonel John Parker and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1904. The justices not only tried all civil actions outstanding on their advent, pleas of the crown and common pleas, but also interrogated the juries of each wapentake and borough as to the Capitula Itineries, the Articles of the Eyre, inquiring into the king's proprietary rights, escheats, wardships, and questions of maladministration. Only a dozen complete rolls survive for this period; but Appendix I (pp. 218-253) gathers together from the Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III (1216-1272) a schedule of Lancashire assizes for which justices were assigned; and Appendix II (306-342) adds the fines and amercements before the justices during that reign, as recorded on the Pipe Rolls.

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Lancashire Assizes
 (1202-1285)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1275-1295)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1898. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1275-1295)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire (1297)
Taxation roll of the lay (non-clergy) inhabitants of Yorkshire from the 25th year of the reign of king Edward I. Latin

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire
 (1297)
Close Rolls (1333-1337)
The close rolls of the 7th to 10th years of the reign of king Edward III, that is from 25 January 1333 to 24 January 1337, record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. In amongst this official material, the rolls were also used as a way of recording many acknowledgments of private debts and contracts between individuals. Most of the contents relate to England, but there are also entries concerning Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France: particularly Scotland, where the king was campaigning during this period. This calendar was prepared by A. B. Hinds of the Public Record Office and published in 1898.

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Close Rolls
 (1333-1337)
Oxfordshire Charters (1350-1359)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Oxfordshire Charters
 (1350-1359)
Norfolk Feet of Fines (1307-1485)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk. These abstracts were prepared by Walter Rye.

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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1307-1485)
Landowners and tenants in Hampshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Hampshire
 (1345-1485)
Yorkshire Charters (1200-1500)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.

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Yorkshire Charters
 (1200-1500)
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