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Cutt Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'cutt'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 63 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire (1440-1441)
The Duchess of Norfolk allowed T. Walter Hall to examine the early archives of her Sheffield estates, and in 1926 he published a volume including abstracts (in translation) of the Sheffield manor court roll from October 1440 to September 1441. In this roll was also the Sheriff's tourn 18 April 1441 of the superior jurisdiction of Hallamshire, covering the sokes of Sheffield, Hannesworth, Bradfield, Southawe and Ecclesfield; and this is also printed. Hall found fragments of a Bradfield court roll of 1385; and devoted the latter half of his book to extracts from the Register of Copyholders' Surrenders, showing surrenders and admittances of copyhold tenants of the manor of Sheffield from 1403 to 1634; plus some miscellaneous deeds and documents relating to the manor and to Hallamshire. The index covers all these.

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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire
 (1440-1441)
Somerset testators and legatees (1501-1530)
Somerset was almost coextensive with the diocese of Bath and Wells, which exercised local probate jurisdiction through its consistory and archdeaconry courts: but superior to the diocese was the province of Canterbury. Somerset testators who also had property outside the county had their wills proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury (PCC). The Somerset Record Society embarked on a program of publishing genealogical abstracts of the registered copy wills of Somerset testators in the PCC archives, and in 1903 (volume xvi) printed abstracts edited by the Reverend F. W. Weaver from the PCC registers 1501-1503 (register Blamyr), 1504-1506 (Holgrave), 1506-1508 (Adeane), 1508-1511 (Bennett), 1511-1514 (Fetiplace), 1514-1517 (Holder), 1517-1520 (Ayloffe), 1520-1522 (Maynwaryng), 1523-1525 (Bodfelde), 1525-1528 (Porch) and 1529-1530 (Jankyn). In addition, the volume includes abstracts of 48 Somerset copy wills in the registers of the Archbishops of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace Library from 1363 to 1491. The heading of each abstract gives the year of making the will (not the year of probate) and the testator's name in bold. Below that is the quire number and name of the PCC register. Date and details of probate are given at the foot of each abstract. Spellings of surnames are preserved as they appear in the registered copy wills, and may vary within a single document.

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Somerset testators and legatees
 (1501-1530)
Inhabitants of Calais, and visitors (1485-1543)
Richard Turpyn, a burgess of Calais, the English enclave on the French coast, compiled (or possessed) a chronicle of events there from 1485 to 1540, a copy of which survived among the Stowe manuscripts in the Harleian collection in the British Museum. This was edited for the Camden Society, together with a number of other papers relating to events in Calais in that period, by John Gough Nichols, and printed in 1846. Many of the persons named in the resulting book are knights and noblemen attending king Henry VII and king Henry VIII when on the Continent on diplomatic or marital business; but there is also a muster roll of the garrison of Calais of 1533 (136-139).

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Inhabitants of Calais, and visitors
 (1485-1543)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1556-1558)
The Privy Council of king Philip and queen Mary was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1556-1558)
Common Pleas: Lincolnshire (1558)
Pleas at Westminster Michaelmas term, 5 & 6 Philip & Mary and 1 Elizabeth, 1558. The court dealt with civil cases: debt, detinue, slander, assault, theft, breach of covenant, formedon, novel disseisin, &c. Each case is marked in the margin with the name of the county to the sheriff of which the writs were issued. Most often, but not necessarily, this would be the county of residence of the defendant. This calendar of the original formulaic record in abbreviated Latin on parchment has been made by David Bethell, preserving all individual detail from each case. The Latin text is translated: English phrases and passages are preserved literatim, in bold. CP 40/1176 mm.1-100

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Common Pleas: Lincolnshire
 (1558)
London funerals and other news (1550-1563)
Henry Machyn was a citizen and merchant-taylor of London. He had a professional interest in the lavish funerals of his fellow citizens, and in October 1550 started a note book giving brief details of these occasions. Soon he added political news, and (in an age before newspapers) he had a journalist's eye for accidents, hangings, the preachings and suppression of heretics, and the fortunes and misfortunes of dissidents. He lived in interesting times; the early death of Edward VI; the failed attempt to install Jane on the throne; the succession of queen Mary, and a lurch towards Catholicism; her marriage to Philip of Spain; her death, and the accession of queen Elizabeth. Machyn's humble journal, written for his own amusement and with a resolute indifference to orthography, became in its time an important historical source, used by Strype, and then edited by John Gough Nichols for the Camden Society and published in 1848.

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London funerals and other news
 (1550-1563)
Yorkshire Feet of Fines (1571-1584)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Yorkshire

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Yorkshire Feet of Fines
 (1571-1584)
Carew Manuscripts (1575-1588)
One of the few detailed sources surviving for 16th-century Ireland is this compilation of government papers and correspondence made by sir George Carew.

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Carew Manuscripts
 (1575-1588)
Traders in Canterbury (1392-1592)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, transcribed and privately printed in 1904 the lists of the Intrantes - those persons, not being free of the city, who paid the annual fine to trade - for the period 1392 to 1592. The names are arranged by ward (Burgate, Newyngate, Westgate, Worgate and Northgate, and give full name, (sometimes) occupation, and fee paid.

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Traders in Canterbury
 (1392-1592)
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