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Cutberd Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'cutberd'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1568)
By Act of Parliament of December 1566 a subsidy of 8d in the on moveable goods and 4s in the on the annual value of land was raised from the lay (as opposed to clergy) population. These are the returns for Suffolk, printed in 1909 in the Suffolk Green Book series.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1568)
London and Middlesex Feet of Fines (1485-1569)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in London and Middlesex.

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London and Middlesex Feet of Fines
 (1485-1569)
Merchants and traders in Aberdeen (1399-1631)
A. M. Munro searched the council registers of the royal burgh of Aberdeen, and compiled this list of burgesses admited to the borough. The entries prior to 1591 were contained in lists engrossed in the council registers at the close of the minutes for the year ending at Michaelmas, but after that date in addition to the annual lists, which are continued, there is almost always a separate minute of admission under the respective dates. The records before 1591 are not only sparser, often with no more than a name, but are also lacking for 1401-1405, 1413-1432, 1434-1435, 1518-1519, 1557 and 1562-1564 - other blanks were filled in from the guildry accounts where such existed. Guild burgesses were allowed unfettered trading rights in Aberdeen; simple burgesses could only deal in Scottish wares (so being barred from the lucrative English and Flemish imports and exports); trade burgesses were limited to their own particular trades; and the council was able ex gratia to create honourary burgesses, who were accorded the full privileges of burgesses of guild and trade, and among whom numbered members of almost every family of note in Aberdeenshire. Burgesses could thus be created by descent, by apprenticeship into a trade, or ex gratia, and in the later portions of this roll the precise circumstances are usually given, sometimes also with the name of a cautioner or surety. Burgesses, masters and cautioners are all indexed here.

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Merchants and traders in Aberdeen
 (1399-1631)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Treasury and Customs Records (1685-1688)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

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Treasury and Customs Records
 (1685-1688)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1701-1753)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1755 to 1833 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1701-1753)
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