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Currie Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'currie'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 713 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Penshurst Manuscripts (1150-1580)
C. L. Kingsford prepared a calendar of the papers of Lord de L'Isle and Dudley at Penshurst Place in Kent for the Historical Manuscripts Commission, of which this first volume was published in 1925. The material is presented in eleven sections: I. 39 deeds relating to the Sydney family's Surrey and Sussex estates from about 1150 to 1502; II. Summary notes on deeds from these and other English counties (mainly Essex, Kent, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire) and from Wales and Ireland; III. Documents relating to Robertsbridge Abbey in Sussex (charters and deeds; rentals; court rolls; reeve's accounts at Footland; and bursar's accounts) from 1160 onwards; IV. Deeds and documents relating to the church and college of Tattershall in Lincolnshire (deeds; statutes and ordinances; miscellaneous papers; court rolls; and accounts (warden's, steward's, precentor's and impositor's, receiver's, bailiffs', and building and post-dissolution accounts); V. Family papers and estates accounts of the Cromwells of Tattershall (general accounts and wills; accounts of stewards of the household; building accounts of Tattershall castle; estate accounts); VI. Summary lists of various rolls, rentals, surveys and accounts, from various counties (mainly Kent and Lincolnshire); VII. Documents relating to Penshurst and its owners; VIII. Sydney family papers; IX. Accounts of the ironworks at Robertsbridge and in Glamorgan; X. Papers relating to the Council of Wales, 1526 to 1580; and XI. Irish Accounts, from sir Henry Sydney's terms as Vice-Treasurer and Lord Deputy of Ireland, 1556 to 1578.

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Penshurst Manuscripts
 (1150-1580)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

CURRIE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1585-1592)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 1 August 1585 to 31 July 1592, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1881. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 774) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, with intermixed Acta Proper (political edicts), Decreta (judicial decisions), Acta Cautionis (acts of caution) and Bands (registration of bonds). After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years: additional acts of caution (775-778); ordinances and acts anent the Borders and the North (779-814); and miscellaneous privy council papers (815-834). The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

CURRIE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1585-1592)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1592-1599)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from August 1592 to May 1599, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1882. The publication brings together the contents of the principal register (Acta Secreti Concilii) with acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp 561-730); Acts and Ordinances relating to the Borders and the North (731-748); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (749-769). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

CURRIE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1592-1599)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

CURRIE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1610-1613)
Darien Company: Edinburgh Subscription List (1696)
The Company of Scotland Trading to Africa and the Indies was established by Act of Parliament, a general subscription list being opened at Edinburgh from 26 February to 1 August 1696, and a separate one at Glasgow from 5 March to 22 April 1696. These lists were published in 1849 by the Bannatyne Club as an appendix to a volume called The Darien Papers. The lists give date, full name, sometimes an indication of address, and the amount of the subscription, in pounds Scots.

CURRIE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Darien Company: Edinburgh Subscription List
 (1696)
Darien Company: Glasgow Subscription List (1696)
The Company of Scotland Trading to Africa and the Indies was established by Act of Parliament, a general subscription list being opened at Edinburgh from 26 February to 1 August 1696, and a separate one at Glasgow from 5 March to 22 April 1696. These lists were published in 1849 by the Bannatyne Club as an appendix to a volume called The Darien Papers. The lists give date, full name, sometimes an indication of address, and the amount of the subscription, in pounds Scots.

CURRIE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Darien Company: Glasgow Subscription List
 (1696)
State Papers Domestic (1702-1703)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. 1 March 1702 to 31 May 1703. The calendar was prepared by Robert Pentland Mahaffy, with certain classes of document extracted and placed in separate appendices (called Tables): I, caveats; II, church and university appointments, &c.; III, commissions, warrants for commissions, notes of commissions and notes of warrants for commissions in the English army for 1702; IV, lord lieutenants and deputy lieutenants; V, Irish warrants; VI, weekly lists of ships of the Home Fleet with their stations and orders; VII, passes, notes of passes, post warrants and licences of absence; VIII, orders on petitions; IX, Scottish warrants and commissions; and X, miscellaneous royal warrants (to the Attorney or Solicitor General; in criminal cases; diplomatic; military warrants; miscellaneous warrants; secretary's warrants, allowance of bills, &c.; and notes of warrants for the appointment of almsmen). The source material in the Public Record Office that he drew on in making this compilation is referenced throughout, and is from the State Papers Domestic (and Military, Naval, Signet Office, Various, and Letter Books and Entry Books), State Papers Scotland (Correspondence, Letter Books and Warrants), State Papers Ireland (and King's Letter Books), and State Papers Channel Islands.

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State Papers Domestic
 (1702-1703)
Treasury Books (1709)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for January to December 1709. These abstracts of the Treasury minute books and corresponding warrants for this period covers a huge variety of topics involving all manner of receipts and expenditure, customs and revenue officials, civil servants, pensioners, petitioners and postmasters figuring particularly among the individuals named.

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Treasury Books
 (1709)
Treasury and Customs Records (1718)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

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Treasury and Customs Records
 (1718)
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