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Cuer Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'cuer'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Devon and Cornwall clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1370-1382)
Ordinations to first tonsure, acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop Thomas de Brantyngham of Exeter. Exeter diocese covered the counties of Cornwall and Devon. Some of these clerks would go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars ('religious') are bracketed separately as such.

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Devon and Cornwall clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1370-1382)
Suffolk householders (1674)
Hearth tax was raised by assessing each householder on the number of chimneys to the dwelling. This provided a simple way to make a rough judgment as to the value of the dwelling: paupers were issued exemption certificates, but they too were listed at the end of each return. The returns were made by township, grouped by hundred. A complete copy of the hearth tax return for each shire was sent to the Exchequer: this is the return for Suffolk for Lady Day (25 March) 1674 (E 179/257/14) as printed in 1905 as Suffolk Green Book no xi, vol. 13. The numbers given are the numbers of hearths: where two or more people are grouped together with one number, it may be assumed that they were heads of separate households sharing a single building with that number of chimneys.

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Suffolk householders
 (1674)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1716)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 August to 31 December 1716.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1716)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1723)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 7 January to 31 December 1723.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1723)
Inhabitants of Greenwich in Kent (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Greenwich in Kent
 (1790-1797)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
Trainee Schoolmistresses in England and Wales (1877)
The Education Department set examinations for candidates for admission into training colleges, and for the office of teacher. This is the list of successful female candidates from England and Wales at the examination at Midsummer 1877. The number in the first column shows order of merit in each class in the examination; then there is the name of the candidate (surname, christian name and any intermediate initial(s)), the school in which engaged, and the training college at which examined. The names of pupil teachers are shown in italics, with the 'school in which engaged' column left blank. These abbreviations are used in the names of schools: B., British; Bd., Board; Ch., Church of England; N., National; P., Parochial; R. C., Roman Catholic; U., Poor Law Union; W., Wesleyan Methodist.

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Trainee Schoolmistresses in England and Wales
 (1877)
Inhabitants of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham and Mottingham (1937)
Kelly's Directory of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham &c. includes this directory of private residents, listed alphabetically by surname and christian name, with address, covering an area extending from the river Thames on the north to Mottingham and Grove Park on the south, and from Eltham on the east to Deptford Creek and Hither Green on the west. These abbreviations are used in the addresses: B, Blackheath; D, Deptford; E G, East Greenwich; G, Greenwich; L, Lee; and Lew, Lewisham.

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Inhabitants of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham and Mottingham
 (1937)
Residents of Gloucester (1955)
Kelly's Directory of the City of Gloucester and District included this section listing private residents, with postal addresses and telephone numbers. The area covered is the city and immediate suburbs, but not the villages in the neighbouring countryside.

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Residents of Gloucester
 (1955)
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