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Crathorne Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'crathorne'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 61 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Yorkshire Inquisitions (1275-1295)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1898. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1275-1295)
Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This first part contains the charters from folios 1 to 233, items I to DXCIII. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Suitors in the king's courts (1342)
Year books containing reports of English law cases survive from 1220 onwards: they contain descriptions of difficult legal cases and decisions, and as such give the names of parties to the cases, but few other names. The Year Book for Trinity Term in the 16th year of the reign of king Edward III was republished in 1900 as part of the Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages, edited and translated (from the Anglo-French) from manuscripts in the Temple, Lincoln's Inn and the British Museum (Harley 741 and Additional MSS 16560 and 25184) by Luke Owen Pike.

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Suitors in the king's courts
 (1342)
Indults for Portable Altars: Diocese of York (1404-1415)
Individuals (laymen, monks or priests) could obtain indults or indulgences from the Pope to possess portable altars, enabling them to do their devotions in unconsecrated places. The fee was 10 groats for one person, 12 for two (frequently a husband and wife). Lists of these indults, headed De Altaris Portatilibus, were entered in the Lateran Regesta in the Vatican archives; from the reigns of popes Innocent VII to John XXIII (1404 to 1415) there are such lists in volumes CXIX, CXXXI, CLIX to CLXI, CLXV, CLXVII and CLXXXIV, from the first year of Innocent VII, the second year of Gregory XII, and the second to fifth years of John XXIII. Those relating to the British Isles were copied and translated by J. A. Twemlow, and printed under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1904. The diocese of York covered Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Hexhamshire, Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Cumberland south of the Derwent.

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Indults for Portable Altars: Diocese of York
 (1404-1415)
Indults to Choose Confessors: Diocese of York (1404-1415)
Individuals (laymen, monks or priests) could obtain indults or indulgences from the Pope to choose their confessor, who might, after hearing their confession, grant them absolution, and enjoin a salutary penance, except in cases reserved to the apostolic see. Lists of these indults, headed De Confessionibus, were entered in the Lateran Regesta in the Vatican archives; from the reigns of popes Innocent VII to John XXIII (1404 to 1415) there are such lists in volumes CXIX, CXXXI, CLIX to CLXI, CLXV, CLXVII and CLXXXIV, from the first year of Innocent VII, the second year of Gregory XII, and the second to fifth years of John XXIII. Those relating to the British Isles were copied and translated by J. A. Twemlow, and printed under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1904. The diocese of York covered Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Hexhamshire, Lancashire north of the Ribble, Cumberland south of the Derwent, and southern Westmorland.

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Indults to Choose Confessors: Diocese of York
 (1404-1415)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1413-1416)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign of king Henry V (21 March 1413 to 20 March 1416) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. C. Fowler, and published in 1910. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. The commissions of the peace issued for the English towns and counties and entered on the rolls, being largely repetitive, have been consolidated in a single appendix.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1413-1416)
London Liverymen: Cutlers (1537)
J. Caley, F.R.S., F.S.A. transcribed this 'curious record' found in the Chapter House, Westminster, 'a list of the freemen of the various companies resident in London and Westminster; from Thomas Lewyn being mentioned as sheriff, it appears it was made in the year 1537.' Thirty-seven companies are listed, comprising 2400 individuals: Armourers, Bakers, Barber Surgeons, Blacksmiths, Brewers, Broiderers, Clothworkers, Coopers, Cordwainers, Curriers, Cutlers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Fletchers, Founders, Freemasons, Fruiterers, Goldsmiths, Grocers, Haberdashers, Innholders, Ironmongers, Joiners, Leather Sellers, Merchant Taylors, Painter Stainers, Plasterers, Plumbers, Saddlers, Salters, Skinners, Spurriers, Tallow Chandlers, Tilers, Vintners, Wax Chandlers and Weavers.

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London Liverymen: Cutlers
 (1537)
Members of the Cutlers' Company of the City of London (1537)
In 1889 the Hon. Harold Dillon published this copy of lists of members of the Armourers' and Cutlers' Companies of the city of London transcribed from one of the Chapter House Books in the Public Record Office.

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Members of the Cutlers' Company of the City of London
 (1537)
Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Yorkshire Feet of Fines (1571-1584)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Yorkshire

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Yorkshire Feet of Fines
 (1571-1584)
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