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Couentre Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'couentre'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Dublin Merchants (1180-1200)
In 1870 documents of the Anglo-Normans in Ireland from 1172 to 1320, edited by J. T. Gilbert, Secretary of the Public Record Office of Ireland, were printed in the Rerum Britannicarum Medii Aevi Scriptores series. These include transcripts of the Dublin guild merchant rolls surviving from that period, which we have now indexed. This, the earliest of these rolls, is damaged, but can be dated to about 1180 to 1200. Those named, although enjoying the privilege of trading in Dublin, were not necessarily resident there, and in several cases a name will be followed by an English address, such as 'de Wigornia' (from Worcester).

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Dublin Merchants
 (1180-1200)
St Ives, Huntingdonshire, Fair Court (1275)
Among the possessions of the Abbey of Ramsey was the right to hold an Easter fair at St Ives in Huntingdonshire. This was an important gathering, attracting merchants from around the country, and from abroad. The fair was regulated by a fair court, 'curia ferie', or court of pyepowder: among the Augmentation Office court rolls there survives the record of the court for 1275 and 1291 (Portfolio 16, No. 16). F. W. Maitland edited selected cases from the 1275 proceedings for publication by the Selden Society, his expanded reading of the Latin text facing an English translation. The courts in question run from 24 April to 24 May 1275.

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St Ives, Huntingdonshire, Fair Court
 (1275)
Patent Rolls: entries for Surrey (1276-1277)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 5th year of king Edward I [20 November 1276 to 19 November 1277], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Surrey
 (1276-1277)
Derbyshire Householders (1327)
Tax return on goods and land held by all lay persons (i. e., non-clergy) in Derbyshire

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Derbyshire Householders
 (1327)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Agbrigg Ash wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Dewsbury, Huddersfield and Wakefield.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Agbrigg Ash wapentake
 (1379)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Osgoldcross wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Pontefract.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Osgoldcross wapentake
 (1379)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Regular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 18 December 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Regular
 (1507)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Regular (1508)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 23 September 1508, by Thomas, bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Regular
 (1508)
Ancient Funeral Monuments in London (1631)
John Weever compiled, by travel and study, this collection of 'Ancient Fvnerall Monvments within the Vnited Monarchie of Great Britaine, Ireland, and the Islands adiacent, with the dissolued Monasteries therein contained: their Founders, and what eminent Persons haue beene in the same interred. As also the death and bvriall of certaine of the Blood Royall; the Nobilitie and Gentrie of these Kingdomes entombed in forraine Nations. A worke reuiuing the dead memory of the Royall Progenie, the Nobilitie, Gentrie, and Communaltie, of these his Maiesties Dominions. Intermixed and illustrated with variety of Historicall obseruations, annotations, and briefe notes, extracted out of approued Authors, infallible Records, Lieger Bookes, Charters, Rolls, old Manuscripts, and the Collections of iudicious Antiquaries. Whereunto is prefixed a Discourse of Funerall Monuments. Of the Foundation and fall of Religious Houses. Of Religious Orders. Of the Ecclesiasticall estate of England. And of other occurrences touched vpon by the way, in the whole passage of these intended labours.' Although he was working before the iconoclasms of the Commonwealth period, the mediaeval memorials that he sought to record were already often mutilated and decayed, the inscriptions illegible or fragmentary, and many of those that he found recorded by earlier antiquaries had completely disappeared. His collection includes not merely physical monuments, but also, where he could find them, burial records and obits from the earlier centuries. This part of his work covers London.

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Ancient Funeral Monuments in London
 (1631)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
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