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Cornes Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'cornes'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 122 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1219-1220)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. Rolls 71 and 71B for Michaelmas term of the 3rd and 4th years, and 72 and 73 for Hilary term and Easter term of the 4th year of the reign of king Henry III (Michaelmas 1219 to Easter 1220) were edited by C. T. Flower of the Public Record Office and published in 1938. Each entry is copied in full, the Latin extended from the abbreviated original, the personal and place names given as in the original; where these vary between duplicate rolls, variant spellings are given in the footnotes. The county of each case was marked in the margin in the originals, and this is shown in italics at the start of each entry in the printed edition.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1219-1220)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1298-1389)
'Cambridge Gild Records' was edited by Mary Bateson for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, and printed in 1903. Several important records for the town are brought together: minutes of the Gild of St Mary in the church of St Mary in the Market Place, 1298-1319 (pages 1-13); bede rolls of the same of around 1349 (14-25); minutes of the Gild of Corpus Christi in the church of St Bene't (26-62); returns for all the Cambridge gilds in 1389 (63-128); a calendar of deeds connected with the gilds of St Mary and Corpus Christi (129-150); and also a subsidy roll for the borough, listing householders in the 8th year of king Edward II (1314-1315) (151-157). The gild minutes include lists of persons entering the gild, usually paying a certain amount for alms and for wax for lights (candles). The bede rolls list prayers for the souls of the deceased, using the formula 'pro anima ..... (et ..... uxoris ejus)', 'for the soul of ..... (and of ..... his wife)'. Dates are not generally given, but most of the entries in these bede rolls are from 1349 to 1352.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1298-1389)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 18 September 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

CORNES. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular
 (1507)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 18 December 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

CORNES. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular
 (1507)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 29 May 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Longdon prebendal church.

CORNES. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular
 (1507)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1606-1616)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

CORNES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1606-1616)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1624-1632)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

CORNES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1624-1632)
Middlesex Recusants (1625-1666)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, Books and Rolls, Sessions of Peace Register, and Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the death of king James I to the Great Fire of London. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry. There are many records of recusants, that is Protestants and Roman Catholics who failed to attend Church of England services. These abstracts, prepared by John Cordy Jeaffreson for the Middlesex County Record Society, are far from being a complete calendar of these extensive records; his purpose was, in part, to notice 'every parchment that should exhibit a famous person's name or any other feature of personal interest'. Being unable to print in full the longer lists of the conventiclers and recusants recorded, he ignores 'those persons who appear from their descriptions to have been of humble degree'.

CORNES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Middlesex Recusants
 (1625-1666)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1661-1667)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

CORNES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1661-1667)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1667-1680)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

CORNES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1667-1680)
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