Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Connick Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'connick'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 14 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 14 records to view, to save and print for £72.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

CONNICK. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Masters of Merchantmen (1804)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), or copper fastened (c f) or copper bolted (c b), sometimes with a date, such as (17)88. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1804, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repairs; len. lengthened; lrp. large repairs; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; S. rprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough Repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel. Where the vessel was armed, the number of guns is given, and occasionally a remark such as 'captured' will appear. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was United States property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; some were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second; I., third - O and U for fourth and fifth are never used) and its stores (1, first; 2, second; 3, third) and the year of survey, e. g. 00 for 1800, or, if surveyed during 1803, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the supplement, and so to ships that had not been registered before 1804: the supplement therefore contains many more foreign ships, and the names of the masters and owners are more up to date than those in the main register.

CONNICK. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Merchantmen
 (1804)
National ArchivesInhabitants of Southwark in Surrey (1851)
The 1851 census return for St George the Martyr, Southwark, registration district: London Road sub-district: enumeration district 1: described as: "Bridge House Place, commencing at No 1 to the end - Borough Road (left hand) to the corner, Cuthbertson's - Southwark Bridge Road (left hand) to the house beyond Clark's Timber Yard - The opposite side of Southwark Bridge Road No 172 to Broom's Yard inclusive and both sides of Great Union Street from Southwark Bridge Road to Bridge House Place". This area lay in the parish of St George the Martyr, Southwark. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 52 Bridge House Place, 1 to 13 Borough Road (including Stones End, Portland Place and Atlas Works), 1 to 30 and 156 to 172 Southwark Bridge Road (including Brooms Yard), 1 to 19 Great Union Street.

CONNICK. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Southwark in Surrey
 (1851)
Dublin Electors (1865)
This alphabetical list of electors for the City of Dublin for 1865 is annotated with details of the votes cast in the election of 15 July 1865 for a member of Parliament. The candidates were John Vance, Esq., D. L. (V), Benjamin Lee Guinness, Esq., D. L., LL. D. (G), and Jonathan Pim, Esq. (P). The first column gives, in bold, the initial of the ward in which lay the property that was the elector's qualification. The second column gives the elector's sequential number (alphabetically) within that ward. Then the elector's full name is given, surname first, and address, usually including house number. The votes cast are shown on the right: where these columns are blank, the elector did not vote. The key to the ward names is: A, South Dock; B, Donnybrook; C, Rathdown; D, Trinity; E, South City; F, Royal Exchange; G, Mansion House; H, Fitzwilliam; I, Wood Quay; K, Merchants' Quay; L, Usher's Quay; M, Arran Quay; N, Inns' Quay; O, North City; P, Rotundo; Q, Mountjoy; R; North Dock. S indicates the register of freemen.

CONNICK. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Dublin Electors
 (1865)
National Bank Shareholders (1873)
Copy of the return by the National Bank to the Inland Revenue listing the 'persons of whom the Company or partnership consists', pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation (often not stated). Although the bank branches listed are all in London, almost all the shareholders were resident in Ireland.

CONNICK. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
National Bank Shareholders
 (1873)
Freeholders in county Wexford (1873-1875)
Owners of an acre or more, whether resident there or elsewhere: with their addresses; the acreage; and a valuation of the land. The survey commenced in February 1873, the last returns being received in November 1875.

CONNICK. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Freeholders in county Wexford
 (1873-1875)
Trainee Schoolmistresses at Cheltenham (1875)
The Education Department set examinations of trainee teachers at the various training colleges in Britain. This is the class list of the women who took examinations at Cheltenham Teacher Training College at Christmas 1875. The names are given for the second year first, arranged by division in the examination (in order of merit for the first and second divisions), and then for the students of the first year, arranged similarly. Full names are given (with initials for middle names). The letter (D.) indicates that the candidate had obtained a certificate of competency as a teacher of drawing. (The sample scan is from a general class list for schoolmistresses)

CONNICK. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Trainee Schoolmistresses at Cheltenham
 (1875)
Trainee Schoolmistresses at Cheltenham (1876)
The Education Department set examinations of trainee teachers at the various training colleges in Britain. This is the class list of the women who took examinations at the Teacher Training College at Christmas 1876. The names are given for the second year first, arranged by division in the examination (in order of merit for the first and second divisions), and then for the students of the first year, arranged similarly. Full names are given (with initials for middle names). The letter (D.) indicates that the candidate had obtained a certificate of competency as a teacher of drawing.

CONNICK. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Trainee Schoolmistresses at Cheltenham
 (1876)
Trainee Schoolmistresses in England and Wales (1878)
The Education Department set examinations for candidates for admission into training colleges, and for the office of teacher. This is the list of successful female candidates from England and Wales at the examination at Midsummer 1878. The number in the first column shows order of merit in each class in the examination; then there is the name of the candidate (surname, christian name and any intermediate initial(s)), the school in which engaged, and the training college at which examined. The names of pupil teachers are shown in italics, with the 'school in which engaged' column left blank. These abbreviations are used in the names of schools: B., British; Bd., Board; Ch., Church of England; N., National; P., Parochial; R. C., Roman Catholic; U., Poor Law Union; W., Wesleyan Methodist.

CONNICK. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Trainee Schoolmistresses in England and Wales
 (1878)
National ArchivesSeaforth Highlanders fighting in Egypt (1882)
The war medal roll for the Egyptian campaign of 1882 is annotated to show those men actually present at Tel-el-Kebir, and thereby also entitled to the Tel-el-Kebir clasp. In addition, there follows an almost duplicate roll of men entitled to the Bronze Star granted by the Khedive of Egypt in recognition of the campaign. Both the 1st and the 2nd battalions, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's) served in this campaign. The 1st battalion embarked for Bombay 21 February 1871. After returning to Aden 25 February, the battalion was sent to Egypt 2 August 1882, returning to England 15 October 1882. The 2nd battalion embarked for India 16 February 1879, but a large contingent joined the 1st battalion for the Egyptian campaign, and Seaforth Highlanders took part in the battle of Tel-el-Kebir.

CONNICK. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Seaforth Highlanders fighting in Egypt
 (1882)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.