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Conners Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'conners'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 20 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Northumberland Assize Rolls for the General Eyre (1256-1279)
The royal justices made periodic general eyres through all the shires of England, hearing civil and criminal cases that had accrued from the lower courts. Here we have the assize rolls of three Northumberland eyres, 24 April to 7 May 1256; 25 June to 15 July 1269; and 20 January to 9 February 1279. The bulk of the text relates to civil pleas from the county of Northumberland and the town of Newcastle upon Tyne; finishing with abstracts of the pedes finium, or feet of fines (lawsuits or pretended lawsuits establishing the ownership of land) arising at the three eyres. But there are also criminal cases (as in the scan here), lists of bailiffs, &c.

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Northumberland Assize Rolls for the General Eyre
 (1256-1279)
The English in France (1433)
King Henry VI of England (one of the grandsons of Charles VI of France) claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. Henry VI came to the throne only seven years after his father had trounced the French at Agincourt; but his cousin, Charles VII, who became king of France in the same year, spent his long reign rebutting the English king's claim to his throne by territorial reconquest and consolidation. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. As Henry VI's reign progressed, and the English grip on northern France loosened, the French Rolls also increasingly include entries concerning the ransoming of English prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1433)
Testators and legatees in London (1358-1688)
The Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1890. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. The bulk of the wills in this volume are from before 1600.

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Testators and legatees in London
 (1358-1688)
Official Papers (1697)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1697)
Official Papers (1698)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1698)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1742)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1742

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1742)
County Cork Freeholders: Booth No 1 (1841)
The poll books of voters in the parliamentary election for county Cork 13 to 15 July 1841 delivered in to the select committee that subsequently looked into the propriety of the proceedings, and then annotated with observations as to those votes to which objection had been raised. There are separate books for seven booths, with the electors' names in order of voting: giving each freeholder's full name, place of abode, situation of the freehold, value, number and date in the alphabetical registry book, and for which candidates they voted (Daniel O'Connell, Edmund Burke Roche, Nicholas Philpot Leader, and Robert Longfield). The seven booths are for these areas: 1. Duhallow barony; 2. Hall County Side, East East Carbery, West East Carbery and East West Carbery; 3. Barrymore and West West Carbery; 4. Condons and Fermoy; 5. Imokelly and West Muskerry.

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County Cork Freeholders: Booth No 1
 (1841)
County Cork Freeholders: Booth No 4 (1841)
The poll books of voters in the parliamentary election for county Cork 13 to 15 July 1841 delivered in to the select committee that subsequently looked into the propriety of the proceedings, and then annotated with observations as to those votes to which objection had been raised. There are separate books for seven booths, with the electors' names in order of voting: giving each freeholder's full name, place of abode, situation of the freehold, value, number and date in the alphabetical registry book, and for which candidates they voted (Daniel O'Connell, Edmund Burke Roche, Nicholas Philpot Leader, and Robert Longfield). The seven booths are for these areas: 1. Duhallow barony; 2. Hall County Side, East East Carbery, West East Carbery and East West Carbery; 3. Barrymore and West West Carbery; 4. Condons and Fermoy; 5. Imokelly and West Muskerry.

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County Cork Freeholders: Booth No 4
 (1841)
Owners of Merchantmen (1852-1853)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was issued annually, listing ships that had been surveyed preparatory to being insured. This is the register issued 1 July 1852 and then annotated as ships were re-surveyed through to 30 June 1853. The ships were numbered by the first letter of their name, and then by number alphabetically through the ships' names and within ships of the same name alphabetically by surname of the master. After the name of the ship there is the type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Bn, brigantine; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; Pol, polacre; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Stm, steamer; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), master's name (as at the time of the last survey); tonnage; place and year of build; owners; port belonging to; destined voyage; number of years first assigned; and character for hull and stores (e. g., A 1), with the year or month (e. g., 50 for 1850, or 2 for February 1852) of inspection. Underneath some entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; c. f., copper fastened; M., sheathed with marine metal; Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; G., sheathed with galvanised iron; Z., sheathed with zinc; F., felt; C. lm., coppered to light water or ballast mark; C. T., copper bolts substituted for treenails; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; Drp., damage repaired; ND., new deck; N TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; NB., new bottom; NK., new keel; plk, Plank; N Klsn, new kelson; alm. rb., almost rebuilt; pt O. M., part old materials (timbers or plank); Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - A, ash; B B, black birch; Bh, beech; C, cedar; E, elm; F, fir; G, gum; Ght, greenheart; Hk, hackmatack; Hm, hemlock; L, locust; Lh, larch; L O, live oak; M, mahogany; P, pine; P P, pitch pine; R P, red pine; Y P, yellow pine; S, spruce; T, teak; Tam, tamarac; W H, witch hazel; W O, white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to owners in the main list. Often a ship would have changed hands by the time of re-survey, and the new owners' names are added in slightly smaller type under the original owners in the seventh column. These new owners are also included in this index. It should be borne in mind that the owners in the main list are those at the time of the respective previous survey for each ship, not necessarily as of 1 July 1852.

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Owners of Merchantmen
 (1852-1853)
Civil Service Appointments (1860)
The Civil Service Commission published an annual list of all persons who had obtained certificates of qualification for appointment in the various public departments. The list gives full name (surname first); department (such as Post Office, or Inland Revenue); situation (such as Letter-carrier, or Clerk); and date of certificate. Candidates whose names are preceded by a dagger obtained appointments as the result of competition; a double dagger indicates open competition. Those whose names are preceded by an asterisk obtained honorary additions to their certificates either for proficiency in extra subjects chosen by themselves, or for marked proficiency in the prescribed subjects. Then follows a further list of these candidates who had obtained Honorary Additions to their Certificates in this way: giving name (surname and initials); position in the service (department and situation); subjects for which honorary additions were made; and 'extent of knowledge displayed' (such as Creditable, Fair, or Very Creditable). 1 January to 31 December 1860.

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Civil Service Appointments
 (1860)
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