Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Conan Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'conan'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 16 records to view, to save and print for £76.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Curia Regis Rolls (1194-1199)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. This transcript of the rolls for October to December 1194 and October 1198 to July 1199 were edited by sir Francis Palgrave for the Commissioners of the Public Records. Most entries have the name of the county in the lefthand margin.

CONAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1194-1199)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1294-1303)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1902. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. The volume also includes two stray inquests, from 1245 and 1282.

CONAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1294-1303)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

CONAN. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Worcestershire Inhabitants (1327)
The Worcestershire Lay Subsidy roll of the 1st year of king Edward III lists lay inhabitants of each township of the shire and of the five boroughs of Droitwich (Wych), Dudley, Evesham, Kidderminster and Worcester, with the amount of tax payable by each. The roll was edited for the Worcestershire Historical Society by the Reverend F. J. Eld, and published in 1895.

CONAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Worcestershire Inhabitants
 (1327)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

CONAN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Treasury Books (1712)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1712. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

CONAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Treasury Books
 (1712)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Scotland (1792)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/66

CONAN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1792)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

CONAN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
London and Middlesex crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: the accused (1836)
Henry Buckler copied in shorthand the proceedings of trials at the Central Criminal Court in London, and his transcripts were printed. This volume (iii), from 1836, covers sessions i to vi of the Copeland mayoralty of 1835 to 1836. The bulk of the cases were from London and Middlesex, with separate sections for Essex, Kent and Surrey, but, preceding all these, Capital Convictions. The names of the accused are annotated with an asterisk to show if they had previously been in custody; an obelisk indicates a known associate of bad characters. Most cases resulted in a guilty verdict, and a large proportion of these led to a sentence of transportation to Australia. This index covers those accused in the London and Middlesex cases of February 1836.

CONAN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London and Middlesex crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: the accused
 (1836)
Railway Subscription Contracts (1845)
21,386,703 6s 4d was promised by about 10,000 subscribers of less than 2,000 per contract to the nearly 200 railway bills deposited in the Private Bill Office during the Session of Parliament for 1845. This alphabetical list gives the full names of the subscribers (surname first), description (i. e., occupation), place of abode, a numerical reference to the title of the railway, the amount subscribed to each, and total. There is a separate key to the titles of the railways.

CONAN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Railway Subscription Contracts
 (1845)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.