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Colli Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'colli'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 6 records (displaying 1 to 6): 

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Charter Rolls (1050-1326)
This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.

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Charter Rolls
 (1050-1326)
The English in France (1414-1415)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 2nd year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1414 to 20 March 1415) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1414-1415)
The English in France (1415-1416)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 3rd year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1415 to 20 March 1416) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883. The battle of Agincourt took place on 25 October 1415, so this roll has many letters of protection for soldiers, and various letters and orders relating to the ransoming of French prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1415-1416)
Norman Rolls (1200-1417)
The dukedom of Normandy is one of the appendages of the English crown, but actual possession of the dukedom was actively contested by the kings of France. During the periods of English power records were kept for Normandy similar to those of the royal administration in England, with enrolment of letters and grants of liberties and privileges and confirmations of previous enjoyed rights. The rolls for 1200 to 1205 and during the reassertion of English rule under Henry V in 1417, were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy for the Commissioners of the Public Records, and published in 1835. Most of the persons mentioned are French inhabitants of Normandy or Englishmen in France, but there is also a long section (from page 122 onwards) of valuation of lands of Normans in England, where English jurors, county by English county, attest to acreage, numbers of cattle &c.

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Norman Rolls
 (1200-1417)
Ambassadors, ministers, soldiers and spies (1547-1553)
The State Papers Foreign of king Edward VI consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe, particularly the Netherlands and France. This calendar was edited by William B. Turnbull and published under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1861. The main text (to page 290) is abstracts of 710 letters from official correspondents abroad; but the remainder of the volume, entitled Calais Papers, deals with the English enclaves on the French coast.

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Ambassadors, ministers, soldiers and spies
 (1547-1553)
National ArchivesQueen's South Africa Medal: Royal Field Artillery: 7th Battery (1901-1905)
The nominal roll for the Queen Victoria's South Africa Medal - awarded (after her death, in the event) to all who had served honourably in the various campaigns in the Boer War - was compiled from these returns from the individual units. Two sets of form were completed. The main one, as in the sample scan, dates from 1901 and gives regimental number, rank, and full name (surname first), followed by a series of columns relating to different actions - Belmont, Modder River, Paardeberg, Dreifontein, Wepener, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, Wittebergen, Defence of Kimberley, Relief of Kimberley, Defence of Mafeking, Relief of Mafeking, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, Rhodesia, Talana, Elandslaagte, Tugela Heights, Defence of Ladysmith, Relief of Ladysmith, Laing's Nek, and Natal; each entitled the man to a separate clasp to the medal, and a tick or a Yes in the appropriate column indicates the man's actual physical presence in that battle. A final column for remarks is important in those cases where the man was no longer in the unit, by removal, death or desertion. The second form that sometimes occurs was returned in 1905, and covers men entitled to the Second South African War Medal and Clasps. It lists men by number, rank and name, checks whether they had claimed the Queen's South Africa Medal, and then enquires as to their suitability as to three Colony Clasps, which could be awarded for service in the Cape, Orange Free, or Transvaal; whether entitled to Date Clasps (South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902); whether also entitled to the King's South Africa Medal; any other corps in which served in South Africa; and remarks (such as becoming non-effective, forfeiture, &c.) WO 100/140

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Queen's South Africa Medal: Royal Field Artillery: 7th Battery
 (1901-1905)
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