Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Closse Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'closse'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 7 records (displaying 1 to 7): 

Buy all
Get all 7 records to view, to save and print for £26.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Court rolls of manors held by Durham priory (1296-1384)
The cathedral priory of Benedictines (black monks) of St Cuthbert at Durham possessed many manors in the county. These were administered by halmotes, or manor courts, held in three sessions (tourns or turns) each year (here marked I., II. and III.), before the terrar (obedientiary), steward, bursar, and/or the prior himself. The court rolls recording proceedings in these courts survive from 1296, 1300, 1309, and from 1333, but with years missing, until becoming fairly continuous from 1365 onwards. Extracts from the rolls from 1296 to 1384 were edited by John Booth and published by the Surtees Society in 1886. The manors under this jurisdiction were Aycliffe, Bellasis, (Newton) Bewley, Billingham, Burdun, Chilton, Coupon, Dalton, Edmondbyers, Ferry (Hill, or Ferrycliffe), Fulwell, Harton, Hebburn, Hedworth, Hesledon, Heworth, Jarrow, Kirk Merrington, East Merrington, West Merrington and Mid Merrington, Monkton, Moorsley, Newton Ketton, Nunstanton, North and South Pittington, East and West Rainton, Ravensflat, Shields, Southwick, Spen, Usworth, Wallsend, Wardley, Wearmouth, Westoe, Willington and Wolviston. The main contents of the records are demises of land held by the bond tenants, neifs, cotmen and others, and of the demesne lands; and bye-laws and pains (penalties) for breach of these; and other minor delinquencies. Normally, when a farm, cottage or piece of land was let to a new tenant, the name of the last tenant is also given, as well as the amount of the rent, and the amount of the gersum (fine on entry). These court rolls contain some of the only surviving evidence for the inhabitants of these townships in this period: but this publication was of extracts, and was not comprehensive. It should also be noted that the third tourn each year (III.) usually took place in January to March, and so by modern dating in the following year. Thus, the third tourn of 1296 was held on 4 March 1297.

CLOSSE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Court rolls of manors held by Durham priory
 (1296-1384)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

CLOSSE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1586-1587)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

CLOSSE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1586-1587)
Quarter Sessions for the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)
The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. Recusants (persons refusing or neglecting to attend parish church services) are listed in the summary of prosecutions on pages 4-5, 10, 17, 21, 42, 55-56, 61, 65, 69, 72, 79, 82, 95, 99, 113-115, 122, 131, 153-155 and 176.

CLOSSE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Quarter Sessions for the North Riding of Yorkshire
 (1605-1612)
British in the East (1630-1634)
The East India State Papers centre on the records of the East India Company, trading to India, the East Indies, Persia and China. They include the Court Minutes of the East India Company.

CLOSSE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British in the East
 (1630-1634)
Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

CLOSSE. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tradesmen of York
 (1559-1759)
Officers of the British Army (1860)
The New Annual Army List first lists officers of the rank of major and above, by rank, and with dates of appointment to each successive higher rank, and (where appropriate) when placed on half pay. An asterisk indicates temporary rank; a superscript p shows that a commission was purchased; a dagger shows officers on the half pay of their last regimental commission. An ornate W indicates those officers actually present in any of the actions of 16, 17 or 18 June 1815 and therefore awarded the Waterloo Medal; P is put before the name of an officer who served in the Peninsula or the South of France; T for the Battle of Trafalgar; VC for the Victoria Cross. For each officer in this section, the final column notes his then present or immediately former regiment and/or office, if any. Next, all the officers of the army are listed, down to the rank of ensign, by regiment or corps, giving rank, name, date of rank in the regiment, and date of rank in the army, with occasional further notes. Again, holders of medals are duly noted, as in the first list. For each regiment the paymaster, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon and assistant surgeons are named, as well as the civilian agent; and the regimental motto, battle honours, and colours of the facings and lace of the dress uniform are stated. After the British regiments of the line, the Rifle Brigade, the officers of the West India infantry, the Ceylon rifles, the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the Royal Canadian Rifles, St Helena Regiment and the Gold Coast Artillery Corps are given; then the officers of the garrisons and other military establishments; the Royal Artillery; Royal Engineers; Royal Marines; Commissariat Department; Medical Department; Staff Officers of Pensioners; Chaplains' Department; Staff (of Great Britain, Australia, Bahamas, Bermuda, British Columbia, Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, East Indies, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Heligoland, Hong Kong, Ionian Islands, Jamaica (including Honduras), Malta, Mauritius, Newfoundland, North America, St Helena, the Western Coast of Africa, and the Windward and Leeward Islands); Military and Civil Department; and Barrack Masters. Then there is a separate list of officers retained on retired full pay and half pay (including the German Legion, the Brunswick Cavalry, the Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Brittaniques, Royal Corsican Rangers, the Greek Light Infantry, Royal Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, the York Light Infantry Volunteers, Foreign Veteran Battalion and the Foreign Corps of Waggoners).

CLOSSE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers of the British Army
 (1860)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.