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Clean Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'clean'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Officers at the Battle of Almanza (1707)
25 April 1707 at Almanza in southeast Spain a decisive battle was fought in the war of the Spanish succession; the French (under the Duke of Berwick) shattered an Anglo-Spanish army (under the Earl of Galway) advancing on Madrid. In January 1711 the House of Lords held an inquiry into the debacle, and among the papers produced was this 'List of the Names of the General Officers and other Commission Officers that were at the Battle of Almanza'. Arranged by regiment, it gives full names of captains, lieutenants, cornets, quartermasters, chaplains, surgeons and adjutants. In almost every case the lists are annotated as to whether each officer was actually present at the battle (most were), and whether killed in the conflict. The list was edited by Maurice F. Bond, clerk of the records to the House, and published in 1949.

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Officers at the Battle of Almanza
 (1707)
Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1559-1759)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered in Scotland (1778)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/60

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Masters of Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1778)
Traders and Merchants in London (1791)
The Universal British Directory was published in five volumes, starting in 1791. The professions included in the London section are very diverse: the addresses are mostly from central London. Some are marked 'F. M.', meaning Freeholder of Middlesex.

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Traders and Merchants in London
 (1791)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Algiers, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.

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London Policemen
 (1843-1857)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
Residents and Traders in Birmingham (1861)
William Cornish's Corporation General and Trades Directory covered Birmingham, Coventry and the towns of the Black Country. The Birmingham section contains both street lists and this general alphabetical directory.

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Residents and Traders in Birmingham
 (1861)
Traders and Professionals in Birmingham and Suburbs (1878)
The Post Office Directory of Birmingham with its Suburbs, edited by E. R. Kelly, and published in 1878, has two main alphabetical lists - Court and Commercial. The suburbs included are Aston, Bickenhill Park, Birchfield End, Castle Bromwich, Erdington, Saltley (with Washwood Heath), Ward End (including Little Bromwich) and Witton, in Warwickshire; Handsworth (with Soho), Harborne, Perry Barr and Smethwick, in Staffordshire; and King's Heath, King's Norton, Moseley, Northfield, Selly Oak and Yardley (including Hall Green and Stechford) in Worcestershire. The Commercial section, indexed here, lists all manner of traders, professional people and businesses.

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Traders and Professionals in Birmingham and Suburbs
 (1878)
National ArchivesMen of the Royal Engineers fighting in South Africa (1877-1879)
What is commonly called the Zulu War Medal was awarded to those British soldiers who fought in a series of conflicts in southern Africa from 1877 (the Kaffir War) through to 1879 (the Zulu War). In 1880 the various units submitted returns of the officers, non-commissioned officers and men 'entitled to the Medal for Military Operations in South Africa during 1877-8-9' and these 'medal rolls' are now in the National Archives. The returns are made with the information arranged in twelve columns: 1. Rank and name 2. Regimental number and rank at the time the medal was earned 3. Whether in possession of medal for previous wars 4. Whether engaged against the Gaikas, Galekas and other Kaffir tribes 1877-8 5. Whether engaged against Pokwane 1878 6. Whether engaged against the Griquas 1878 7. Whether engaged against the Zulus 1879 8. Whether engaged against Sekukuni as set forth in Par. 2. G. O. 9. Whether engaged against Moirosi's stronghold 10. Entitled to medal without clasp under Par. 4. 11. Serving with regiment, depot, dead, discharged, deserted, &c. 12. Notes and cross-references to the Adjutant-General's medal lists. WO 100/46.

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Men of the Royal Engineers fighting in South Africa
 (1877-1879)
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