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Chitty Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'chitty'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 342 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1626)
The Privy Council of Charles I was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1626)
Sussex Knighthood Special Commission: Dill hundred (1630)
King Charles I 28 January 1630 issued a commission to sit in London and treat with all his subjects who would compound for their fines for not taking up knighthood (a responsibility incumbent on all men of full age having 40 or more a year in land) and for non-attendance to receive their knighthood at his coronation. The returns from the commissioners for Sussex, preserved in the Public Record Office, were edited by sir Henry Ellis and published in 1864. The returns are arranged by rape, the collectors giving the full name of each person paying their composition (usually 10): but more detail is supplied under the returns from the special commission that then certified those persons who had not appeared, refused to pay or excused themselves as being under age or of insufficient means &c. 'notwithstanding they are fitt and able men'. The returns from the special commission specify either the hundred (within the rape) or the parish of residence.

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Sussex Knighthood Special Commission: Dill hundred
 (1630)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
House of Lords Proceedings (1692-1693)
Private bills dealing with divorce, disputed and entailed estates: petitions, reports and commissions: naturalisation proceedings.

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House of Lords Proceedings
 (1692-1693)
Official Papers (1698)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1698)
Treasury Books (1706-1707)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for October 1706 to December 1707. These abstracts of the Treasury minute books and corresponding warrants for this period covers a huge variety of topics involving all manner of receipts and expenditure, customs and revenue officials, civil servants, pensioners, petitioners and postmasters figuring particularly among the individuals named.

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Treasury Books
 (1706-1707)
Correspondence and Journal of Charles Talbot (1674-1708)
Charles Talbot, earl and duke of Shrewsbury, served as Secretary of State, and this material includes his correspondence in that capacity from 1694 to 1700. He then proceeded on an extended tour of the Continent, from 1700 to 1706, of which he kept this journal. The collection also includes much personal correspondence, and some papers relating to the colonies in America and the West Indies.

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Correspondence and Journal of Charles Talbot
 (1674-1708)
Treasury Books (1708)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from January to December 1708. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

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Treasury Books
 (1708)
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