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Chate Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'chate'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 29 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of London (1337-1352)
Letter Book F of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. The book includes an assessment of the inhabitants in 1346 (pages 143 to 149) listing many householders; a list of mayors and sheriffs from 1189 to 1548 (276-303), and records of the city's use of infangthef (summary execution of certain criminals) down to 1409. The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1904.

CHATE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Inhabitants of London
 (1337-1352)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1715)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 May to 31 December 1715.

CHATE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1715)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

CHATE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
Anglican Schoolmasters (1850)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded certificates of merit to teachers throughout Britain, and published annual lists of those qualifying in the previous years. Masters and mistresses are listed separately, with surname and initials, and school at which teaching, post town or county, and grade of the certificate: each of the three classes of certificate being subdivided into three. There are five separate lists for masters and mistresses: 1. Teachers in schools in connexion with the Church of England; male students in the Training Schools of the National Society, and of the several Diocesan Boards of Education; and female students in the Training Schools of the National Society (Whitelands, Chelsea), the Home and Colonial School Society (Gray's Inn Road, Holborn), and the Salisbury and York and Ripon Diocesan Boards of Education. 2. Teachers, in England and Wales, of British, Wesleyan and other Protestant Schools, not in connexion with the Church of England; 3. Teachers, in England and Wales, of Roman Catholic Schools; 4. Teachers of schools in Scotland, in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Training Colleges; and female students in training schools. 5. Teachers of schools in Scotland, not in connexion with the Established Church; male students in the Training Schools of the Free Church (at Edinburgh and Glasgow); and female students in training schools. This is the list, corrected to 1 January 1851, published in 1851.

CHATE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Anglican Schoolmasters
 (1850)
Schoolmasters and trainees with Certificates of Merit (1856)
The Committee of Council on Education for England and Wales produced an annual report which included several lists of teachers and trainee teachers, including an Annual Calendar of Teachers who have Obtained Certificates of Merit (completed to 1 January 1856), from which this sample scan is taken. The teachers are listed alphabetically by surname and initial, with name of school, post town or county, and grade, as either certificate or class. Student teachers were classed at the end of each year of training, so the column for class shows a student's class (1, 2 or 3) at the end of their first or second year of training. The teacher may then be awarded a certificate of merit by Her Majesty's Inspector, in which case the class and division of the certificate awarded appears in the columns for Certificate. No certificate of merit was granted a student, as a teacher, until he or she had been for two years in charge of the same elementary school, and the certificate was granted on the basis of two reports of performance as a teacher in school. If the first report was favourable, the teacher was paid for the first year on the scale of the lowest class; if the second report was favourable, augmentation and class of certificate was fixed for the next five years, after which (and so on from time to time) the certificates were open to revision. The value of the certificate, in the first instance, was not fixed higher than the first division of the third class, for any student who had resided less than two years at a training school under inspection. This is the index to the schoolmasters and male students in training schools.

CHATE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Schoolmasters and trainees with Certificates of Merit
 (1856)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.

CHATE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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London Policemen
 (1843-1857)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1880)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, July to September 1880

CHATE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1880)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, October to December 1881

CHATE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, July to September 1881

CHATE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1882)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, April to June 1882

CHATE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1882)
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