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Charde Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'charde'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clerks and Clergy in Somerset (1329-1363)
The register of bishop Ralph de Salopia or Shrewsbury of Bath and Wells, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, but with some parochial affairs and disputes with names of parishioners. The diocese of Bath and Wells at this period was almost exactly coextensive with the county of Somerset.

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Clerks and Clergy in Somerset
 (1329-1363)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Militia in Bruton hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Bruton, Milton Clevedon, North Brewham, Pitcombe, South Brewham, Upton Noble (former chapelry of Batcombe) and Yarlington. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Bruton hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1618-1619)
The Privy Council of James I was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1618-1619)
Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire (1550-1667)
The borough of Reading in Berkshire comprised three ancient parishes - St Giles, St Lawrence and St Mary. The churchwardens' accounts of Reading St Mary from 1550 to 1667 were transcribed by Francis N. A. Garry and A. G. Garry and published in 1893. The accounts, usually signed off by the two churchwardens and two surveyors of the highways for the year, listed the income and expenditure of the church. Income included annual payments for seats in the pews; rents from church property; fees for the use of the pall and for tolling the knell (knill) at funerals, and for opening graves; and sums received for 'gatherings', i. e. money gathered from communicants at Easter, Hocktide, Mayday, Hallowmas, Christmas and Whit. Expenditure was largely on maintaining the church fabric, and paying the minor officials - most of the names found on this side of the account are of local workmen busy with repairs.

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Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire
 (1550-1667)
Calcutta Bridegrooms (1843)
The Indian Mail, 'A Monthly Register for British & Foreign India, China, & Australasia' commenced publication 9 May 1843 as a continuation of the digest of Eastern intelligence that thitherto had formed a part of the Asiatic Journal. The Register section contained notices of births, marriages and deaths from the presidencies of Calcutta (extending across northern India, and into Burma), Madras, and Bombay (including Aden), as well as Australasia, Ceylon, China, Cape of Good Hope, Mauritius, and Singapore.

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Calcutta Bridegrooms
 (1843)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Trafalgar, a 120-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors of H. M. S. Trafalgar who fought at Sebastopol (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Trafalgar, a 120-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff. Here we have the list of the men from the ship who served as part of the naval brigade that actually fought at Sebastopol (Sevastopol, Sevastapol).

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Sailors of H. M. S. Trafalgar who fought at Sebastopol
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Calcutta (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Fatshan clasp, for being actually present during the successful operations against the Chinese war junks in the Escapo creek, which commenced 25 May and were finally closed at Fatshan 1 June 1857; the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; and the Taku Forts 1858 clasp, for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Calcutta
 (1856-1860)
Science Schools and Classes: Elementary Examination: Class Lists (1869)
The Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education published these class lists giving the names of all the successful candidates in the examination of science schools and classes taken in May 1869. The candidates were of three levels: honours; second stage or advanced examination; third stage or elementary examination. Twenty-three subjects were offered. These are the lists for the elementary examination. The tables, arranged subject by subject, give the candidate's full name (surname first), age, and occupation - or, in the case of those not yet of working age, father's occupation, preceded by (f.). Many candidates sat and were successful in more than one subject, and so appear in more than one list. The subjects are: I. Practical, Plane and Solid Geometry; II. Machine Construction; III. Building Construction; IV. Elementary Mathematics; V. Higher Mathematics; VI. Theoretical Mechanics; VII. Applied Mechanics; VIII. Acoustics, Light, and Heat: IX. Magnetism and Electricity; X. Inorganic Chemistry; XI. Organic Chemistry; XII. Geology; XIII. Mineralogy; XIV. Animal Physiology; XV. Zoology; XVI. Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology; XVII. Systematic and Economic Botany; XVIII. Mining; XIX. Metallurgy; XX. Navigation; XXI. Nautical Astronomy; XXII. Steam; XXIII. Physical Geography.

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Science Schools and Classes: Elementary Examination: Class Lists
 (1869)
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