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Causby Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'causby'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 14 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors (1580-1613)
Richard St George, Norroy King of Arms, and Henry St George, Bluemaster Pursuivant of Arms, of the College of Arms, conducted a heraldic visitation of Cheshire in 1612 and 1613, recording pedigrees of gentlemen claiming the right to bear coats of arms. A copy of their visitation was elaborated by the addition of other Cheshire pedigrees in Harleian Manuscript 1535: and this manuscript was edited by sir George J. Armytage and John Paul Rylands for publication by the Harleian Society in 1909. It has a large number of pedigrees of Cheshire gentry, with a few brief abstracts from early documents; and the pedigrees of some offshoots from old Cheshire stocks which had taken root in other counties. The pedigrees largely relate to the period back from 1613 to the previous visitation of 1580, but there is also some older material, particularly back into the 15th century. In most cases each pedigree is prefixed by a heraldic description of the coat of arms. The printed volume also includes (pages 1 to 4) a list of Cheshire men who disclaimed the right to bear a coat of arms at the 1613 visitation, taken from Harleian Manuscript 1070.

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors
 (1580-1613)
PCC Probate Abstracts (1652-1653)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator

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PCC Probate Abstracts
 (1652-1653)
Household of the Prince of Wales (1741)
'A General List, or Catalogue, Of all the Offices and Officers Employ'd In the several Branches of his Majesty's Government Ecclesiastical, Civil, Military, &c. In South-Britain, or England' gives the names (and often the annual salaries) of the government functionaries, civil servants, churchmen and military, systematically arranged section by section. Section 88 lists the officers and servants of the Prince of Wales, including the officers of the Duchy of Cornwall, officers and servants of the Bedchamber and Above Stairs, those under the direction of the Master of the Horse, and the officers of his Royal Highness's Family Below Stairs down to the soil-carrier, the turn-broaches and the kitchen boys, and the housekeepers, porters and watchmen at his minor residences.

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Household of the Prince of Wales
 (1741)
National ArchivesApprentices (1760)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1760.

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Apprentices
 (1760)
Inhabitants of the City of London (1780)
In August 1780 this loyal petition was made to king George III, subscribed by 2800 'Liverymen, Freemen, and Others, Inhabitants of the City of London', expressing grateful thanks 'for that Protection, which, by the Wisdom, Vigilance, and Activity of your Majesty in Council, was so seasonably given to us, at a Time when our Lives, Property, and every Thing dear to us, were in such imminent Danger, from the Violence of the most outrageous Banditti that ever existed.' This refers to the Gordon Riots, caused by a bill which Parliament introduced in 1778 to repeal certain harsh laws against Roman Catholics: in June 1780 a mob protesting against this repeal assembled in London, forced its way into the House of Commons, attacked Newgate prison releasing many prisoners, and destroyed a great deal of property, until dispersed by the military.

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Inhabitants of the City of London
 (1780)
Traders and professionals in London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet of Businesses, Professions, &c.': coverage is good; about 30,000 individuals are recorded.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1805)
Voters in Northampton (1826)
A poll to elect two burgesses to represent the town and borough of Northampton, was held there 12 to 20 June 1826. This poll book lists the voters alphabetically by surname, giving christian name, abode, occupation (in italics), and whether they voted for sir George Robinson, sir Robert Henry Gunning, or William Leader Maberly.

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Voters in Northampton
 (1826)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
The Edinburgh Gazette (1846)
The Edinburgh Gazette is the official publication in which various Scottish legal notices are issued, as well as promotions and casualty lists for the British army as a whole, and brief lists of English bankrupts. The key source for tracing details of Scottish bankruptcies, insolvencies, and dissolutions of business partnerships.

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The Edinburgh Gazette 
 (1846)
Inhabitants of Birmingham (1850)
Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. This long alphabetical section lists inhabitants of Birmingham.

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Inhabitants of Birmingham
 (1850)
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