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Carlick Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'carlick'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Masters of Merchantmen (1822)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Bk, barque; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), patent felt (P F), copper fastened (c f), copper bolted (c b), or copper repaired (C rp) sometimes with a date, such as (18)18. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1822, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repair; len. lengthened; lrp. large repair; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; Srprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; Hk., hackmetack; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel; W. O., white oak. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was American property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; a few were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; Hn, Harrington; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Mt., Maryport; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Pl., Plymouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Wo., Workington; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second) and its stores (1, first; 2, second) and the year of survey, e. g. 09 for 1809, or, if surveyed during 1821, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the main list and the supplement.

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Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Merchantmen
 (1822)
Owners of Merchantmen (1822)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Bk, barque; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), patent felt (P F), copper fastened (c f), copper bolted (c b), or copper repaired (C rp) sometimes with a date, such as (18)18. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1822, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repair; len. lengthened; lrp. large repair; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; Srprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; Hk., hackmetack; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel; W. O., white oak. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was American property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; a few were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; Hn, Harrington; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Mt., Maryport; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Pl., Plymouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Wo., Workington; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second) and its stores (1, first; 2, second) and the year of survey, e. g. 09 for 1809, or, if surveyed during 1821, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to owners in the main list and the supplement.

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Sample scan, click to enlarge
Owners of Merchantmen
 (1822)
Maldon Poll: Voters Resident in Maldon and the country (1826)
On 7 June 1826 and the fourteen following days (Sundays excepted) a poll was held to elect Members of Parliament to represent the borough of Maldon in Essex. The candidates were the Hon. George Mark Arthur Way Allanson Winn (W) of Warley Lodge, who received 1747 votes; Thomas Barrett Lennard (L) esquire of Regent's Park, London, 1454 (or 1455) votes; and Quintin Dick (D) esquire of Curson Street, London, 1401. In all 3113 electors were polled, 2527 living in Maldon and the country, 586 in London and its environs. This poll book is divided into two sections, the 586 voters from London &c being listed separately. The names are listed alphabetically by surname, then christian name(s), occupation (in italics), address; and the right-hand column shows the votes cast. Those who did not vote are not listed.

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Maldon Poll: Voters Resident in Maldon and the country
 (1826)
Pupil Teachers in Essex: Girls (1851)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).

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Pupil Teachers in Essex: Girls
 (1851)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 44th (The East Essex) Regiment of Foot, based at Colchester, having returned from the Crimea, embarked for India 26 August 1857, and was transferred thence to China. The regiment took part in the capture of the Taku Forts.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
Meritorious Service Medal (1918)
King George V on 17 June 1918 approved of the award of the Meritorious Service Medal to these Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men, in recognition of valuable services rendered with the Forces in France during the Great War.

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Meritorious Service Medal 
 (1918)
Naturalizations (1919)
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1919, refer to naturalizations from December 1918 to November 1919. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. An dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality.

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Naturalizations
 (1919)
Electrical Engineers (1952)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. There were seven grades of member (honorary member, member, associate member, companion, associate, graduate, and student); this is the list of the 19,699 members of the latter three grades as of 1 July 1952. Most of the members were from Britain, but there were Oversea Branches for Calcutta, Ceylon and Ireland, and Oversea Committees in Australia, India, Malaya and Singapore, New Zealand and South Africa. The associates (A), graduates (G) and students (S) are listed together in a single alphabetical list by surname and christian name(s), with year of entering the grade. Some of the members also belonged to specialized sections of the institution, and these are indicated at the right by the letters M (measurements), R (radio), S (supply) and U (utilization).

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Electrical Engineers
 (1952)
Residents of Southend-on-Sea (1955)
Kelly's Directory of Southend-on-Sea, Leigh-on-Sea, Westcliff and Neighbourhood for 1955 lists private residents by surname, christian name(s), house, street and area, for the whole of the county borough of Southend-on-Sea in Essex, including Westcliff-on-Sea (W), Prittlewell, North Shoebury, South Shoebury or Shoeburyness (S. & S. S), Milton, Southchurch, Southchurch Wick, Thorpe Bay (T. B), Leigh-on-Sea (L), Nobles Green and Eastwood (E).

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Residents of Southend-on-Sea
 (1955)
Pilot Officers: General Duties Branch (Branch List) (1957)
The Air Force List for 1957 contains gradation lists for all serving officers, corrected, generally, up to the appointments and promotions gazetted 2 April 1957. The officers are listed by branch, rank, and date of seniority; the names are given surname first, initials, decorations, and various sets of initials relating to their particular qualifications or expertise. A double-headed dagger before the name denotes a permanent direct commission; a dagger a national service commission; an asterisk some other non-permanent commission. The main abbreviations are: a. a., qualified at Army Long Gunnery Staff Course (A. A.); c. f. s., qualified flying instructor (with an asterisk if A1 category, without, A2); I, 1st class interpreter; i, 2nd class interpreter; i. d. c., completed a course at the Imperial Defence College; j. s. s. c., completed a course at the Joint Service Staff College; P, on probation; p. f. c., graduate of Pilot Flying College; p. s. a., graduate of R. A. F. Staff College; p. s. c., graduate of Military Staff College; q. s., R. A. F. graduate of the Military or Naval Staff College; Sp, medical or dental specialist; t. p., graduate of Empire Test Pilots' School; Z, qualified in A. I. S. Inspection Duties. In the Ground Section lists a further set of abbreviations, in bold in brackets in front of the names, identifies certain specialities - AcC, aircraft control; Bal, balloon; FC, fighter control; Ph, photographic; PhI, photographic interpretation; RS, radar supervisor.

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Pilot Officers: General Duties Branch (Branch List)
 (1957)
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