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Bygges Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bygges'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 7 records (displaying 1 to 7): 

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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury (1214-1439)
Christopher Wordsworth, Master of the Hospital of St Nicholas in Salisbury, Wiltshire, published an edition of the 15th-century cartulary of that foundation in 1902. While transcribing the text, he interspersed it with notes and lists from his own researches so as to provide a general history of the hospital, and some of the material dates from much later than 1500, and relates to those institutions which he regarded as daughter institutions or offshoots of the hospital. There are later additions to the cartulary through to 1639, and records of the Chapel of St John Baptist on the Isle, the Scotist College of St Nicholas de Vaux (Valle Scholarium), and the collegiate church of St Edmund, Salisbury. There is also a calendar of records belonging to the hospital. The cartulary itself is a quarto codex of 80 leaves, copying charters of bequests to the hospital, and in these the main persons to appear are the benefactors, the witnesses, and occasionally the names of tenants, occupiers of adjoining tenements, and members of the hospital clergy. The cartulary is in six geographical sections: I, Box, Wyvelesford and Manningford Bohun; II, Broad Hinton; III, Fyssherton (Fisherton Aucher or Anger); IV, East and West Harnham; V, Salisbury; and VI, Gerardeston (Gurston in Broadchalke).

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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury
 (1214-1439)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1568)
By Act of Parliament of December 1566 a subsidy of 8d in the on moveable goods and 4s in the on the annual value of land was raised from the lay (as opposed to clergy) population. These are the returns for Suffolk, printed in 1909 in the Suffolk Green Book series.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1568)
Middlesex Sessions (1549-1603)
This printed calendar collates a number of surviving records from Middlesex sessions for the period. Principally these are the Gaol Delivery Rolls (G. D. R.) and the General Sessions of the Peace Rolls (G. S. O. P. R.). Both series cover general criminal indictments (bills) together with the recognizances of the witnesses to attend; but the Gaol Delivery Rolls, by their very nature, tend to deal with the more serious cases - felonies where the accused could not be released on bail. The General Sessions rolls also include the sheriff's lists of bailiffs, sub-bailiffs, high and petty constables in the shire; writs of venire facias for production of jurors, writs of capias, lists of jurors, jury-panels &c. The Gaol Delivery Rolls also include coroners' inquests, writs of supersedeas, and memoranda of proclamations. Special inquiries are recorded in separate Sessions of Oyer and Terminer (S. O. T.) rolls and Inquest or Inquisition rolls (I. R.) Although coverage is good, none of the sequences of rolls for this period is complete. A peculiarity of this calendar is that in the case of actual incidents, the date given at the start of each entry is the date that the incident was alleged to have taken place (for instance, 1 June 11 Elizabeth (1569) in the sample scan) rather than the date of the court proceedings.

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Middlesex Sessions
 (1549-1603)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire (1550-1667)
The borough of Reading in Berkshire comprised three ancient parishes - St Giles, St Lawrence and St Mary. The churchwardens' accounts of Reading St Mary from 1550 to 1667 were transcribed by Francis N. A. Garry and A. G. Garry and published in 1893. The accounts, usually signed off by the two churchwardens and two surveyors of the highways for the year, listed the income and expenditure of the church. Income included annual payments for seats in the pews; rents from church property; fees for the use of the pall and for tolling the knell (knill) at funerals, and for opening graves; and sums received for 'gatherings', i. e. money gathered from communicants at Easter, Hocktide, Mayday, Hallowmas, Christmas and Whit. Expenditure was largely on maintaining the church fabric, and paying the minor officials - most of the names found on this side of the account are of local workmen busy with repairs.

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Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire
 (1550-1667)
Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.

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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury
 (1392-1800)
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