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Buse Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'buse'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 21 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1194-1199)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. This transcript of the rolls for October to December 1194 and October 1198 to July 1199 were edited by sir Francis Palgrave for the Commissioners of the Public Records. Most entries have the name of the county in the lefthand margin.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1194-1199)
Liberate Rolls (1251-1260)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 36th to 44th years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1251-1260)
The English in Holland and Flanders (1588)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were at this period attempting to throw off the Spanish yoke, and Elizabeth sent considerable forces to their aid. The papers relating to Holland and Flanders in the State Papers Foreign are so voluminous in consequence, that a separate calendar was edited by Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, this volume, covering January to June 1588, being published in 1931.

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The English in Holland and Flanders
 (1588)
Well-Affected Men of Kent (1648)
After the capture of king Charles I by the forces of Parliament, this petition signed by over 1100 of 'the well affected in the county of Kent' was drawn up, calling on the Commons to prosecute his trial vigorously, and not to be satisfied with 'less than the blood of those persons, who have been the principall Authors' of the civil war; and also to transfer authority over all the militia in the country to 'his Excellency the Lord Fairfax'. Thomas Hearne the antiquary published a copy of the petition 'taken by no very skillfull scribe' in 1774, observing that such petitions were 'very diligently drawn up, not by the honest part, but by the very scum, of the Nation, signed generally by persons, in all respects, of an ordinary Reputation.' In this particular case, he noted, 'you'll scarce find one among them of any note or distinction.'

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Well-Affected Men of Kent
 (1648)
Treasury Books (1712)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1712. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

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Treasury Books
 (1712)
Masters of Merchantmen (1804)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), or copper fastened (c f) or copper bolted (c b), sometimes with a date, such as (17)88. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1804, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repairs; len. lengthened; lrp. large repairs; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; S. rprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough Repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel. Where the vessel was armed, the number of guns is given, and occasionally a remark such as 'captured' will appear. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was United States property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; some were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second; I., third - O and U for fourth and fifth are never used) and its stores (1, first; 2, second; 3, third) and the year of survey, e. g. 00 for 1800, or, if surveyed during 1803, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the main list.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1804)
Inhabitants of Devon (1830)
Pigot & Co.'s National Commercial Directory lists traders, farmers and private residents in the county.

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Inhabitants of Devon
 (1830)
National ArchivesMerchant Seamen (1835-1844)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner's previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/10) covers mariners whose surnames start with Bu and By (and McBu and McBy).

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Merchant Seamen
 (1835-1844)
Mariners' Church Donations: Bideford (1845)
Each monthly issue of The Mariners' Church Soldiers' and Sailors' Gospel Temperance Magazine, published by the Temperance British and Foreign Seamen's, Soldiers' and Steamers' Friend Society, and Bethel Flag Union, to promote religious instruction and temperance moral reformation and general unsectarian missions in the British Empire, at home and abroad, contained a section of Acknowledgments of sums contributed by individuals or through the Bethel churches to the society's funds, and in support of the orphan home. There are general lists, as well as those for particular localities - Appledore, Aylesbury, Barnstaple and Newport, Bath, Bedford, Bembridge, St Helens and Ryde, Berkhampstead, Bideford, Bonchurch, Bradford (Yorkshire), Braintree and Bocking, Brighton, Bristol, Castle Hedingham, Chelmsford, Cheltenham, Chesham, Cirencester, Coggeshall, Colchester, Cowes, Devizes, Dunstable, Gloucester, Gosport, Greenwich and Woolwich, Halstead, Hampstead, St John's Wood and the suburbs of London, Hastings, Hemel Hempstead, Hitchin, Holloway, Hull, Ilfracombe, Ipswich, Islington, Leeds, Leighs (Essex), Leighton Buzzard, Lewes, London, Luton, Maidenhead, Maldon, Manchester, Marlborough, Mortimer, Newbury, Kintbury and Hungerford, Newport (Isle of Wight), Niton, Norwich, Readng, Richmond (Surrey), Rye, Salisbury, Shanklin, Shorwell, Slough and Nailsworth, South Molton, Southampton, Staines, Stony Stratford, Sudbury (Suffolk), Ventnor, Wakefield, Wallingford, Watford, West Bromwich, Winchester, Windsor, Winslow and Buckingham, Witham, Woburn, Worthing, Wroxall (Isle of Wight), Yarmouth (Isle of Wight), Yarmouth (Norfolk) and York.

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Mariners' Church Donations: Bideford
 (1845)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1849)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1849, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1849)
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