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Burgs Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'burgs'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 6 records (displaying 1 to 6): 

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Inhabitants of Manchester (1591)
The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 6 October 1591.

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Inhabitants of Manchester
 (1591)
Inhabitants of Manchester (1615)
The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 5 October 1615.

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Inhabitants of Manchester
 (1615)
National ArchivesMerchant Seamen (1835-1844)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner's previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/10) covers mariners whose surnames start with Bu and By (and McBu and McBy).

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Merchant Seamen
 (1835-1844)
Traders and professionals in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording over 100,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1856)
Scottish Abstainers (1865)
Lists of members of the Scottish Temperance League, branch by branch; donations and subscriptions; officers of abstinence societies; and ministers connected with the league. Mostly Scotland, but including England, Ireland and the colonies.

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Scottish Abstainers
 (1865)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1900)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1900.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1900)
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