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Bude Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bude'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 17 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Norfolk Feet of Fines (1192-1214)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk

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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1192-1214)
Oblata or Fine Rolls (1200-1216)
All the surviving oblata or fine rolls of the reign of king John were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Commissioners of the Public Records in 1835. These are the oblata rolls of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign, and the fine rolls of the 6th, 7th, 9th, 15th, 16th and 17th years. These rolls contain notices of the oblations or fines offered to the Crown to procure grants and confirmations of liberties and franchises of markets, fairs, parks and free warren; for exemption from tolls, pontage, passage and murage; to obtain justice and right; to stop, delay or expedite pleas, trials and judgments; and to remove suits and processes from inferior tribunals into the King's Court. Fines were also extracted for licence to trade, or permission to exercise commerce or industry of any kind, and to have the aid, protection, or goodwill of the King; to mitigate his anger or abate his displeasure; to be exempted from knighthood either for a term or for ever, and from attending the King in his foreign expeditions; they were also demanded for seisin or restitution of ancestral lands or chattels; for allowing delinquents to be replevied or bailed; for acquittal of murder; and for pardon of trespasses and misdemeanours; for the 'year and a day' of the lands and goods of felons and fugitives. Almost all entries have the county in question indicated in the left hand margin.

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Oblata or Fine Rolls
 (1200-1216)
Patent Rolls: entries for Suffolk (1275-1276)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 4th year of king Edward I [20 November 1275 to 19 November 1276], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Suffolk
 (1275-1276)
Norfolk Feet of Fines (1196-1307)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk. These abstracts were prepared by Walter Rye.

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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1196-1307)
Suffolk Charters (1530-1539)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Suffolk Charters
 (1530-1539)
Besiegers of Colchester (1648)
The siege of Colchester was one of the most severe of the Civil War, and lasted from 14 June to 28 August 1648. Kent and Essex Royalists on their way into Norfolk and Suffolk turned aside into Colchester, hoping to get recruits there. Fairfax pursued from his headquarters in London, and when on 12 June he appeared with 5,000 men they were obliged to make hasty preparations for defence. The town was ill-fitted to stand a siege, and the 4,000 Royalist troops were most of them newly levied and ill-armed, but after a repulse on 14 June 14, Fairfax realized that a long siege was inevitable, and busied himself with raising forts to completely isolate the town. On 2 July the work of circumvallation was finished, and though meeting with fierce resistance, Fairfax gained post after post. Early in August famine added to the misery of the besieged, and the citizens began to clamour for surrender. On 19 August, Norwich, the Royalist leader, asked for terms; negotiations went on for some days, and finally on 28 August, Fairfax occupied the town. Three of the Royalist leaders were shot, and the soldiers were sent to labour in the West Indies, or to enforced military service under the Venetian Republic. The townsmen were made to pay a heavy fine. These accounts list disbursements to workmen digging the fortifications and to artificers, soldiers and officers involved in the siege. The total sum paid was about 1,695.

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Besiegers of Colchester
 (1648)
Suffolk householders (1674)
Hearth tax was raised by assessing each householder on the number of chimneys to the dwelling. This provided a simple way to make a rough judgment as to the value of the dwelling: paupers were issued exemption certificates, but they too were listed at the end of each return. The returns were made by township, grouped by hundred. A complete copy of the hearth tax return for each shire was sent to the Exchequer: this is the return for Suffolk for Lady Day (25 March) 1674 (E 179/257/14) as printed in 1905 as Suffolk Green Book no xi, vol. 13. The numbers given are the numbers of hearths: where two or more people are grouped together with one number, it may be assumed that they were heads of separate households sharing a single building with that number of chimneys.

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Suffolk householders
 (1674)
Treasury and Customs Officials, Civil Servants, Military Officers and Pensioners (1706-1707)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies, October 1706 to December 1707: an abstract prepared by William A. Shaw, and issued in 1952 by authority of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, but not hitherto indexed. These are the main Revenue and Expenditure Accounts, together with the audited Declared Accounts for each main department: Guards and Garrisons; the Army in the Low Countries; the Army in Spain and Portugal; purchase of horses for remounting the Forces sent to Portugal, and subsidy paid to the King of Portugal; Marines; Transport; Remittances to Flanders; Chelsea Hospital; Navy Treasurer; Commission for Sick and Wounded Seamen and Exchange of Prisoners-of-War; Prize Ships; Admiralty Droits; Salvage Money; Ordnance; Cofferer of the Household; Treasurer of the Chamber; Her Majesty's Works and Buildings; Queen Anne's Private Pensions; Treasury Solicitor; the Tin Affair in Cornwall and Devon; Customs; Tobacco; Silks and Linens; Excise; Salt Duty; Malt Duty; the Mint; Wine Licences; General Letter Office and Penny Post Office; Stamped Vellum, Parchment and Paper; Hackney Coach Licences; Hawkers and Pedlars; Hanaper; First Fruits and Tenths.

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Treasury and Customs Officials, Civil Servants, Military Officers and Pensioners
 (1706-1707)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1749)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1749)
English Civil Servants (1791)
Officers and officials of the various government departments, mostly in London, listed in the Universal British Directory. It includes the royal household, the departments of state, and public offices

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English Civil Servants
 (1791)
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