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Brownsdon Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'brownsdon'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Schoolmasters and trainees with Certificates of Merit (1856)
The Committee of Council on Education for England and Wales produced an annual report which included several lists of teachers and trainee teachers, including an Annual Calendar of Teachers who have Obtained Certificates of Merit (completed to 1 January 1856), from which this sample scan is taken. The teachers are listed alphabetically by surname and initial, with name of school, post town or county, and grade, as either certificate or class. Student teachers were classed at the end of each year of training, so the column for class shows a student's class (1, 2 or 3) at the end of their first or second year of training. The teacher may then be awarded a certificate of merit by Her Majesty's Inspector, in which case the class and division of the certificate awarded appears in the columns for Certificate. No certificate of merit was granted a student, as a teacher, until he or she had been for two years in charge of the same elementary school, and the certificate was granted on the basis of two reports of performance as a teacher in school. If the first report was favourable, the teacher was paid for the first year on the scale of the lowest class; if the second report was favourable, augmentation and class of certificate was fixed for the next five years, after which (and so on from time to time) the certificates were open to revision. The value of the certificate, in the first instance, was not fixed higher than the first division of the third class, for any student who had resided less than two years at a training school under inspection. This is the index to the schoolmasters and male students in training schools.

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Schoolmasters and trainees with Certificates of Merit
 (1856)
Debtors (1880)
County Court Judgments in England and Wales

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Debtors
 (1880)
Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1923)
King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.

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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man
 (1923)
Officers of the British Army and of the Indian Army (1934)
The Half-Yearly Army List, issued By Authority, 30 June 1934, lists all officers in active service at that date, and this list was evidence of the status and rank of the officers contained in it. The entries are set out as a gradation list, by rank, from field-marshals to lieutenants, and within each rank in order of seniority at that rank. Each officer's name (surname first, in capitals, then christian name and present rank (with date of achieving that rank) and regiment &c. are given, for convenience, in bold type, with any national decorations in italics after the name. Each entry also gives date of birth, number of days service in the ranks, dates of service in each rank of officer, particular offices and postings (with dates) and, where appropriate, a summary of war service, and medals. For all but the oldest of the officers then serving, the war service details are for the Great War (1914-1921), and campaigns in Iraq, Waziristan, and the North West Frontier of India. War services are not given in this edition for Indian Army officers, except in that their entries are preceded by a crossed swords symbol where they have seen war service in a theatre of war overseas. After the gradation list of officers, there is a section for the Royal Malta Artillery; and then (pages 1152 to 1185) warrant officers - staff or garrison serjeant-majors, educational serjeant-majors, serjeant-major (physical training and educational) instructors, regimental serjeant-majors (and corporal-majors, farrier-serjeant majors, master gunners, assistant instructors in gunnery, experimental serjeant-majors, artillery clerks, farrier-serjeant-majors, artificer serjeant-majors, clerks of works, mechanist, superintending clerks, draughtsmen, 1st class staff serjeant-majors, transport, supply, conductors, sub-conductors, armourers, armament artificers, headmasters, schoolmasters, marine gunners, and bandmasters. The section for the Royal Army Chaplains' Department lists all chaplains (1st to 3rd class); and that for Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service has all matrons, sisters and staff nurses. The lists of nurses do not give date of birth: all are unmarried. The book concludes with the Yeomen of the Guard, the Honourable Company of Gentlemen-at-Arms, and the King's Body Guard for Scotland, in each case giving name (surname and initials, not christian names), honours, name of late regiment, and date of appointment.

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Officers of the British Army and of the Indian Army
 (1934)
Chemists (1950)
The Royal Institute of Chemistry was founded in 1877, and was open only to British subjects (and also, in due course, to citizens of the newly-created Republic of Ireland). Associates of the institute (A. R. I. C.) qualified either by studying chemistry, physics, mathematics and an optional science for the institute's examination (which insisted on a high standard of practical laboratory efficiency); or by obtaining good honours degrees or equivalent qualifications, with chemistry as principal subject, and having undergone training in allied sciences. Associates of at least three years' standing could then be admitted to the Fellowship (F. R. I. C.) either by taking a further examination in a special branch of chemistry, or by submitting the results of work or evidence of experience sufficient to justify the Council in granting exemption from such further examination. This register of fellows and associates, correct to 31 August 1950, contains 11,545 names, arranged alphabetically, surname first (in capitals), with qualifications, current address, telephone number, and (in italics) a brief description of present post in the chemical industry. Finally, year of admission as associate (A.) (and, where appropriate, fellow (F.) is given on the right-hand side. With this may appear the notation (x) for a fellow of the Chemical Society, (y) for a member of the Society of Chemical Industry, or (z) for a joint subscriber to all three chartered bodies.

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Chemists
 (1950)
Residents of Stratford-upon-Avon (1953)
Kelly's Directory of Warwick, Leamington Spa, Stratford-upon-Avon, Kenilworth, &c. for 1953 includes this listing of private residents of Stratford-upon-Avon. Full names are given, surname first, and address.

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Residents of Stratford-upon-Avon
 (1953)
Inhabitants of Liverpool (1955)
Kelly's (Gore's) Directory of Liverpool and District includes this alphabetical list of residents and traders, with names, addresses, and (where applicable) telephone numbers. Covering a large area around Liverpool, the directory includes Bootle, Birkenhead and Wallasey, and thus the populous areas of southwest Lancashire and of the Wirral peninsula of Cheshire.

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Inhabitants of Liverpool
 (1955)
Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1956)
King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known. Of course, these boys who entered the school in the years immediately running up to 1956 were either still at school, or certainly had their careers ahead of them, and so their records in the register are more or less confined to name, birthdate, parentage, school house, and home address.

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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man
 (1956)
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