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Brouster Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'brouster'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Harthill wapentake (1380)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Market Weighton, Pocklington and South Cave.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Harthill wapentake
 (1380)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1390-1399)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 13th year of king Richard II, who had intended to raise the earldom of Chester into a principality, to his overthrow by Henry IV.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1390-1399)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1610-1613)
Merchants and traders in Aberdeen (1399-1631)
A. M. Munro searched the council registers of the royal burgh of Aberdeen, and compiled this list of burgesses admited to the borough. The entries prior to 1591 were contained in lists engrossed in the council registers at the close of the minutes for the year ending at Michaelmas, but after that date in addition to the annual lists, which are continued, there is almost always a separate minute of admission under the respective dates. The records before 1591 are not only sparser, often with no more than a name, but are also lacking for 1401-1405, 1413-1432, 1434-1435, 1518-1519, 1557 and 1562-1564 - other blanks were filled in from the guildry accounts where such existed. Guild burgesses were allowed unfettered trading rights in Aberdeen; simple burgesses could only deal in Scottish wares (so being barred from the lucrative English and Flemish imports and exports); trade burgesses were limited to their own particular trades; and the council was able ex gratia to create honourary burgesses, who were accorded the full privileges of burgesses of guild and trade, and among whom numbered members of almost every family of note in Aberdeenshire. Burgesses could thus be created by descent, by apprenticeship into a trade, or ex gratia, and in the later portions of this roll the precise circumstances are usually given, sometimes also with the name of a cautioner or surety. Burgesses, masters and cautioners are all indexed here.

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Merchants and traders in Aberdeen
 (1399-1631)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Edinburgh (1712-1713)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. There was a single collection for the whole of Scotland, made in Edinburgh. The sums collected are recorded in Scottish money, with conversion to sterling for transfer to London. A Scottish pund was worth 20 English pence. January 1712 to June 1713. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at Edinburgh
 (1712-1713)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Scotland (1728-1731)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces and from Scotland. The sums collected are recorded in Scottish money, with conversion to sterling for transfer to London. A Scottish pund was worth 20 English pence. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1728-1731)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
National ArchivesInhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851)
The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 7: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises Grosvenor Park (North & South) Includings Huts on Common, South Terrace, South side of Grosvenor St., and West side of Walworth Road to Parish boundary. Boundary Lane & Bolingbroke Row on the East side of Walworth Road to the Turnpike". HO 107/1567. This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 44 Grosvenor Park North; Oliver Cottage; 1 to 4 Grosvenor Park Terrace; Red Garden Cottage, Lorrimore Common; 1 and 2 Lorrimore Common; Temperance Cottage, Windmill Lane; 5 to 38 Grosvenor Park South; 1 to 13 South Terrace, Grosvenor Park; Gardeners Cottage; 4 to 12 (including Lupton Cottage, 5) and 21 to 23 Grosvenor Street South; 1 to 4 White Cottage, Grosvenor Street; 6 to 18 Grosvenor Place, Walworth Road; 1 to 3 Bolingbroke Cottage, Boundary Row; Pilgrim Cottage, 21 Boundary Row; 1 to 3 Pilgrim Place, Boundary Row; 4 Vine Cottage; Omnibus(s) Yard; 5, Milk House, Boundary Row; 1 to 4 Elizabeth Place, Boundary Row; 1 to 26 Bolingbroke Row, Walworth; and Gurneys Stables.

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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey
 (1851)
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