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Brigs Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'brigs'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 38 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Wakefield Lay Subsidy: Final Return: Northgate (1545)
The lay subsidy of Agbrigg wapentake in the West Riding of Yorkshire (207/186) is in two parts: the anticipation and the final return. The subsidy, assessed at 1d in the pound on goods up to 5, 2d in the pound on goods worth 5 and above, and 2d in the pound on land, had been granted by parliament to king Henry VIII for three years. The anticipation, certified by the commissioners 30 April 1545, listed by township the holders of 6 or more in land or 10 or more in goods 'which said persons by virtue of our souerayng lords most jentill request and lovyng desire ar content frankly, quietly and indeladby to pay ther last payment' in advance, by way of anticipation of the third year's payment. The final return, certified 26 October 1545, lists the less wealthy part of the population, again by township, with their full names, assessment of their property, and (right-hand column) the amount due to be collected from them.

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Wakefield Lay Subsidy: Final Return: Northgate
 (1545)
Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners: excluded names (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. In his preface to the first volume, Burton remarked that "There might perhaps be objections to the abundance of names of persons and places unknown to fame; but it was considered that in such a work the proper names of all persons and places occurring in the Register should be preserved, to be at the service of genealogical as well as historical investigators". But by this, second, volume, he decided that complete coverage was impractical, with "the crowding in of proper names, all but a few being the names of obscure persons ... Borderers are called up in considerable groups, and ordered to find, or recorded as having found, sureties for giving compensation to persons plundered, or for good conduct for the future. Several burgesses are sometimes entered in a minute about a Corporation quarrel. When the particulars of unimportant private litigations are omitted, the names remain." He therefore devised this 'Index of Names excluded from the Text', giving name, conditions, and date in register.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners: excluded names
 (1569-1578)
Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1619)
J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.

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Worcestershire Quarter Sessions
 (1619)
Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials (1614-1641)
Each year a copy of the previous year's register of baptisms, marriages and burials, attested by the incumbent and churchwardens, was returned to the diocesan authorities. The peculiar of Southwell in Nottinghamshire was ordinarily exempt from episcopal jurisdiction in such matters, and the 24 parishes in the peculiar made similar returns to the Southwell registry. A few of these survive from this period, and they were transcribed by T. N. Blagg and printed as the first volume of the Record Series of the Thoroton Society in 1903. The returns are for Beckingham 1634, 1637, 1641; Bleasby 1633; Blidworth 1638; Calverton 1617, 1623; *Caunton 1614, 1619, 1628, 1641; Cropwell Bishop 1638, 164; Darlton 1622, 1633, 1641; *Dunham 1641; Edingley 1638; Farnsfield 1623; Halam 1622, 1637; Halloughton 1622, 1637; *Holme 1623, 1625, 1627, 1638, 1641; Kirklington 1622, 1638; *Morton 1622, 1623; *North Muskham 1623, 1633, 1638; South Muskham 1623; *Norwell 1638, 1641; Oxton 1622; *Ragnall 1623; Southwell 1633, 1640; Tithby (cum Cropwell Butler) 1625; Upton 1633, 1638; and Woodborough 1623, 1627, 1637, 1638 and 1640. Parishes marked with an asterisk (*) are those for which the original registers were missing for the period covered by the transcripts.

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Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials
 (1614-1641)
Surrey Sessions (1661-1663)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from October 1661 to January 1663, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for October 1661, January 1662, April 1662, July 1662, October 1662 and January 1663.

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Surrey Sessions
 (1661-1663)
Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland (1660-1675)
This correspondence deals with a large variety of personal and public affairs in Ireland and England.

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland
 (1660-1675)
Official Papers (1677-1678)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1677-1678)
Treasury Books (1698-1699)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from September 1698 to July 1699. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

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Treasury Books
 (1698-1699)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
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