Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Bread Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bread'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

Buy all
Get all 9 records to view, to save and print for £48.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

British settlement of America and the West Indies (1669)
This compilation of abstracts of State Papers, Colonial Series, America and West Indies, preserved in the Public Record Office, edited by W. Noel Sainsbury, was published in 1889, and has been reindexed by us. The key materials were drawn from the Colonial Entry Books. For 1669 there are Entry Books for Barbadoes (No. 5); Bermudas (15); Carolina (20); Jamaica (28); Maryland (52); Montserrat (55); Nevis (57); New England (60); Newfoundland (65); New York (68); Surinam (77); and Plantations General (92). Book 102 is for Lists of Acts 1668-1688. Some other sources were collated with these, especially entries from State Papers Domestic entry books. The contents vary from grave matters of state to the transportation of individual felons.

BREAD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British settlement of America and the West Indies
 (1669)
Treasury Books (1709)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for January to December 1709. These abstracts of the Treasury minute books and corresponding warrants for this period covers a huge variety of topics involving all manner of receipts and expenditure, customs and revenue officials, civil servants, pensioners, petitioners and postmasters figuring particularly among the individuals named.

BREAD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Treasury Books
 (1709)
Treasury Books (1716)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1716. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

BREAD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Treasury Books
 (1716)
Masters of Merchantmen (1785)
The Daily Universal Register of April 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Plymouth, Whitby, Cowes, Falmouth, Bristol and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Creek(e), in the Downs, off the Lizard, off Scilly, off the Start, in Studland Bay, off Whitby, off the Wight, at Aberdeen, Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Barcelona, Bayonne, Belfast, Bombay, Bonny, Bordeaux, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Carlingford, Cartagena, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Galway, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hamburg, Havre de Grace, Hull, Jersey, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lochryan, Malaga, Marseilles, Montserrat, Nantes, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Oporto, Ostend, Penzance, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Eustatia, St John's, St Kitts, St Vincents, Scarborough, Scilly, Seville, Southampton, Stangate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Venice, Waterford, Weymouth, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, North Carolina, Philadelphia, South Carolina and Virginia; and Coast Lists made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.

BREAD. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Merchantmen
 (1785)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

BREAD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

BREAD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/8

BREAD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
Electors for Kellington (1848)
On 14 and 15 December 1848 an election took place for a Knight of the Shire for the West Riding of Yorkshire in the House of Commons. The candidates were Edmund Denison and sir Culling Eardley Eardley, gaining 14,743 and 11,795 votes respectively. The county franchise at this period included freeholders of land worth 40s or more a year; 10 copyholders and long-leaseholders; and 50 short-leaseholders and tenants. This poll book was published in 1849. Former poll books had been compiled from the sheriff's returns; but as these were now transmitted to the Home Office immediately after an election, in this instance the polling was marked from the check-clerk's returns, carefully compared with the registers marked in the poll booths at the time of voting. The votes for the respective candidates are indicated by the numerals 1 (Denison) and 2 (Eardley). The omission of these numerals indicates that the elector did not vote. Many names which appear on the register of particular townships are completely omitted in this poll book: in all these cases, the same name will be found recorded in some other township, the elector having two or more qualifications. In such cases, his name only appears in the poll book in the actual township for which he chose to vote; or, if he did not vote at all, in that township for which he was qualified that lay closest to his actual residence. The townships are arranged alphabetically within polling district; and within each township the names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, and the elector's residence is given. Many of the electors resided outside the township for which they were qualified - some in other counties. Moreover, at the end of each polling district there is a list of persons registered to poll in that district, from townships is other districts.

BREAD. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Electors for Kellington
 (1848)
Freeholders in county Cork (1873-1875)
Owners of an acre or more, whether resident there or elsewhere: with their addresses; the acreage; and a valuation of the land. The survey commenced in February 1873, the last returns being received in November 1875.

BREAD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Freeholders in county Cork
 (1873-1875)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.