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Brayford Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'brayford'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 22 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

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Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Golden Hill and Tunstall Directory (1818)
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in sections, the first seven relating to the north of the county: 1. Newcastle-under-Lyme; 2. Golden Hill, Tunstall &c. (including Talk'o'th'Hill, Red Street, Chesterton, Greenfield, Sandiford, New Field and Brown Hills); 3. Burslem &c. (including Longport, Cobridge and Hot Lane); 4. Hanley and Shelton; 5. Stoke, Etruria and Penkhull; 6. Lane End &c. (including Fenton and Lane Delph); 7. Leek. In each section the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation and address.

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Golden Hill and Tunstall Directory
 (1818)
Newcastle-under-Lyme Directory (1818)
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in sections, the first seven relating to the north of the county: 1. Newcastle-under-Lyme; 2. Golden Hill, Tunstall &c. (including Talk'o'th'Hill, Red Street, Chesterton, Greenfield, Sandiford, New Field and Brown Hills); 3. Burslem &c. (including Longport, Cobridge and Hot Lane); 4. Hanley and Shelton; 5. Stoke, Etruria and Penkhull; 6. Lane End &c. (including Fenton and Lane Delph); 7. Leek. In each section the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation and address.

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Newcastle-under-Lyme Directory
 (1818)
Staffordshire Villages Directory: Chesterton (1818)
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in thirty sections for the major towns, followed by lists for the separate villages. In each village the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation.

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Staffordshire Villages Directory: Chesterton
 (1818)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1856)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1856)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1858)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1858, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1858)
Insolvents (1880)
Liquidation of insolvents' assets in England and Wales, October to December 1880

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Insolvents
 (1880)
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