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Boues Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'boues'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1196-1201)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1196-1201)
Liberate Rolls (1200-1211)
The chancery liberate rolls of the 2nd, 3rd and 5th years of the reign of king John (who came to the throne 27 May 1199) record the details of payments and allowances issued out of the Court of Chancery under the Great Seal of England, and were directed to the Treasurer. The rolls were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Record Commission in 1844. Included in the volume is a transcript of a Praestita Roll (on which were entered the sums of money which issued out of the treasuries by way of imprest, advance or accommodation) of the 12th year of king John and a Misae Roll (detailing the daily expenses of his court) of the 11th year. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1200-1211)
Oblata or Fine Rolls (1200-1216)
All the surviving oblata or fine rolls of the reign of king John were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy and printed by the Commissioners of the Public Records in 1835. These are the oblata rolls of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign, and the fine rolls of the 6th, 7th, 9th, 15th, 16th and 17th years. These rolls contain notices of the oblations or fines offered to the Crown to procure grants and confirmations of liberties and franchises of markets, fairs, parks and free warren; for exemption from tolls, pontage, passage and murage; to obtain justice and right; to stop, delay or expedite pleas, trials and judgments; and to remove suits and processes from inferior tribunals into the King's Court. Fines were also extracted for licence to trade, or permission to exercise commerce or industry of any kind, and to have the aid, protection, or goodwill of the King; to mitigate his anger or abate his displeasure; to be exempted from knighthood either for a term or for ever, and from attending the King in his foreign expeditions; they were also demanded for seisin or restitution of ancestral lands or chattels; for allowing delinquents to be replevied or bailed; for acquittal of murder; and for pardon of trespasses and misdemeanours; for the 'year and a day' of the lands and goods of felons and fugitives. Almost all entries have the county in question indicated in the left hand margin.

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Oblata or Fine Rolls
 (1200-1216)
Fine Rolls (1216-1246)
The fine rolls of the 1st to 30th years of the reign of king Henry III record part of the government administration in England. These excerpts from the rolls list in transcript applications by plaintiffs for various writs (such as 'ad terminum' and 'pone') and for assizes to be held by the justices in eyre to look into their grievances. A fine of half a mark (6s 8d) or a mark (13s 4d) was usually levied; the cases are normally identified by county, and record that the appropriate sheriff had been notified. There are also more extensive records, in which more detail is given. The excerpts were made by the Record Commission and printed in 1835.

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Fine Rolls
 (1216-1246)
Patent Rolls: entries for Nottinghamshire (1276-1277)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 5th year of king Edward I [20 November 1276 to 19 November 1277], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Nottinghamshire
 (1276-1277)
Patent Rolls: entries for Westmorland (1279-1280)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 8th year of king Edward I [20 November 1279 to 19 November 1280], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Westmorland
 (1279-1280)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Scotland and the Netherlands (1492-1503)
Andrew Halyburton, a Scottish merchant resident at or near Middleburgh, one of the chief trading ports of the Netherlands, compiled this account book in which he lists his sales of Scottish produce and his purchases of products of the east and south at Antwerp, Bruges and Ghent. Each merchant with whom he traded was given a separate account in this ledger; sometimes he would copy the merchant's mark onto the page. The names that occur are thus largely thus of European merchants, from as far afield as Italy, Germany, Denmark, Osterland, Livonia, Norway, Sweden, Poland, France, Spain and Barbary. This book survived as 'a large and very old book, of what nature unknown' among the Promiscuous Account Books in the General Register House in Edinburgh. It was edited by C. Innes, and printed as the Ledger of Andrew Halyburton, Conservator of the Privileges of the Scotch Nation in the Netherlands 1492-1503' together with 'The Book of Customs and Valuation of Merchandises in Scotland 1612' at Edinburgh in 1867.

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Scotland and the Netherlands
 (1492-1503)
Secretary of State's Papers (1596)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1596)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered in Cambridgeshire (1720-1723)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1719. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered in Cambridgeshire
 (1720-1723)
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