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Botson Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'botson'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Insolvents (1828)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

BOTSON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Insolvents
 (1828)
Voters in the Eastern Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Great Yarmouth (1832)
Under the Reform Act of 1832, the County of Norfolk was allotted four Members of Parliament, being two Knights of the Shire for the Eastern Division and two for the Western. The Eastern Division included the hundreds of Blofield, Clavering, Depwade, Diss, Earsham, North Erpingham, South Erpingham, Eynsford, East Flegg, West Flegg, Forehoe, Happing, Henstead, Humbleyard, Loddon, Taverham, Tunstead and Walsham. The franchise was available to freeholders worth 40s a year or over; copyholders and long leaseholders of 10 or more; short leaseholders and tenants of 50 or more: but limited to adult males. Voting took place on 20 and 21 December 1832. This poll book lists the voters for each parish, with the votes cast. Voting was not compulsory, and non-voters are not listed. Each voter had two votes: the votes are indicated in the columns C. (Lord Henry Cholmondeley, 2852); P. (Nathaniel William Peach, 2960); K. (Hon. George Keppel, 3261); and W. (William Howe Windham, 3304). The voters were not necessarily resident in the parish, but derived their franchise from the land there; so some of the names have addresses outside the parish. After the name there may appear the abbreviations cop. for copyholder; oc. for occupier; or le. for leaseholder: the rest are freeholders or annuitants.

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Voters in the Eastern Division of Norfolk, for the parish of Great Yarmouth
 (1832)
Insolvents (1835)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

BOTSON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Insolvents
 (1835)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/7

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, October to December 1881

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1881)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1882)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, April to June 1882

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1882)
Boys at University College School (1901-1931)
In 1830 a school was set up adjoining the University and College of London on Gower Street; the school was enlarged from 1860 to 1876, and then removed to Frognal in 1907. In 1931 this register was published, listing all boys entering the school from Christmas term of 1859 to the summer entrants of 1931. The dates are abbreviated (98-01 = 1898-1901, &c.), each session being reckoned as beginning in September of one year and ending in the July of the next; the date of joining the school is indicated by the former, although it may fall in the latter, but the date of leaving by the latter, although it may fall in the former. Thus, if a boy came at any time during the Session 1863-64 and left any time during 1868-69, his date would be given 1863-69. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname, and then chronologically under each surname, full name being given where known. An asterisk * indicates that that particular boy lost his life in the Great War: in these cases, rank and regiment have been given where possible. Addresses as of 1931 are given where known. Italics in christian names or initials indicate that that particular boy was known, in 1931, to be dead. (a) (b) &c placed before christian names indicates brothers. In some cases occupation in later life is shown (A, artist; B, barrister; C A, chartered accountant; Ch, chemist; E, engineer; H C S, home civil service; I C S, Indian civil service; Med, physician or surgeon; M S E, member of the Stock Exchange; Mus, musician; Rev, minister of religion; S, solicitor). This is the index to those boys who were at the school in the period 1901 to 1931.

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Boys at University College School
 (1901-1931)
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