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Bosdon Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bosdon'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Cheshire Court Rolls (1259-1290)
Civil and criminal cases for most of Cheshire were handled by the county courts. Here we have the county court rolls for November 1259 to August 1260, December 1281 to September 1282, and December 1286 to September 1289. The city of Chester exercised its own jurisdiction, and here we have crown pleas and presentments from 1287 to 1297. The royal manor of Macclesfield in the east of the county had three independent jurisdictions - the hundred, forest and borough. Royal justices in eyre dealt with civil and criminal cases from the hundred and forest during their yearly visits, and here we have records from 1284 to 1290. Also covered by this index is an Inquest of Service in Time of War in Wales of 1288, listing knight's fees in the county.

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Cheshire Court Rolls
 (1259-1290)
Lancashire landowners and their tenants (1310-1333)
This compilation of abstracts of Lancashire inquisitions, extents (surveys) and feudal aids (taxes) was prepared for the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society and printed in 1907, from originals in the national archives of the Public Record Office. Almost all the material has been translated from the original abbreviated Latin: where surnames have been Anglicized, the original is shown in italics, as with the word 'faber' in the sample scan.

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Lancashire landowners and their tenants
 (1310-1333)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1350-1359)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 23rd to the 33rd years of king Edward III.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1350-1359)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1360-1369)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 33rd to the 43rd years of king Edward III.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1360-1369)
The English in France (1435)
King Henry VI of England (one of the grandsons of Charles VI of France) claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. Henry VI came to the throne only seven years after his father had trounced the French at Agincourt; but his cousin, Charles VII, who became king of France in the same year, spent his long reign rebutting the English king's claim to his throne by territorial reconquest and consolidation. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. As Henry VI's reign progressed, and the English grip on northern France loosened, the French Rolls also increasingly include entries concerning the ransoming of English prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1435)
Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Secretary of State's Papers (1601)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1601)
Cheshire gentry and their ancestors (1580-1613)
Richard St George, Norroy King of Arms, and Henry St George, Bluemaster Pursuivant of Arms, of the College of Arms, conducted a heraldic visitation of Cheshire in 1612 and 1613, recording pedigrees of gentlemen claiming the right to bear coats of arms. A copy of their visitation was elaborated by the addition of other Cheshire pedigrees in Harleian Manuscript 1535: and this manuscript was edited by sir George J. Armytage and John Paul Rylands for publication by the Harleian Society in 1909. It has a large number of pedigrees of Cheshire gentry, with a few brief abstracts from early documents; and the pedigrees of some offshoots from old Cheshire stocks which had taken root in other counties. The pedigrees largely relate to the period back from 1613 to the previous visitation of 1580, but there is also some older material, particularly back into the 15th century. In most cases each pedigree is prefixed by a heraldic description of the coat of arms. The printed volume also includes (pages 1 to 4) a list of Cheshire men who disclaimed the right to bear a coat of arms at the 1613 visitation, taken from Harleian Manuscript 1070.

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors
 (1580-1613)
Official Papers (1639)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1639)
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
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