Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Boid Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'boid'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 11 records to view, to save and print for £64.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Douglas family charters (1150-1400)
The register of the more ancient writs of the Douglases of Dalkeith, Midlothian, Earls of Morton is probably the oldest chartulary of lay possessions in Scotland, and contains about 300 charters. It was edited by C. Innes and published by the Bannatyne Club in 1853 as part II of the Registrum Honoris de Morton. The names that occur are principally those of grantors, grantees and witnesses, mostly from Midlothian.

BOID. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Douglas family charters
 (1150-1400)
Officers and tenants of the Scottish crown (1488-1496)
In 1887 the 10th volume of Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum, or The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, was published in Edinburgh as part of the Scottish Series of Chronicles and Memorials. The main text is a transcript in extended Latin, but with some passages reduced to an abstract in English (in italics), of the rolls of the Scottish royal exchequer from 19 June 1488 to 12 October 1496 (rolls cclxxviii to ccxcv, old numbers ccxciii to cccix). This more or less continuous series alternates between accounts of the Ballivi ad Extra (royal chamberlains, lessees of lordships, rangers of wards, receivers &c) and those of the Custumars (receivers of customary payments and similar revenues) and bailies (bailiffs) of burghs (boroughs). In all, they give a summary description of all these sources of royal revenue - and not only mention the payers and receivers in general, but also refer to many occasional payments to and receipts from individuals hardly otherwise found in the surviving records. An appendix (pages 629 to 763) of rentals of royal property throughout Scotland in the same period gives a rich harvest of personal names; and another (764-772), an Index in Libros Responsionum, lists persons to whom sasine (seisin) was granted in 1492 to 1496.

BOID. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers and tenants of the Scottish crown
 (1488-1496)
Official Papers (1694-1695)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Here we have the period from January 1694 to June 1695.

BOID. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1694-1695)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1691-1700)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county). As shown in the sample scan, licences to practise midwifery and to teach are also included. The index covers bondsmen as well as brides and grooms.

BOID. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1691-1700)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Scotland (1777)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/60

BOID. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1777)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered in Scotland (1777)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/60

BOID. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1777)
Bankrupts and solicitors (1810)
English bankrupts and their solicitors, as reported in the European Magazine. July to December 1810.

BOID. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Bankrupts and solicitors
 (1810)
Deaths, Marriages, Literary News, Bankrupts, Patents, and Dissolutions of Partnerships (1822)
English death, marriage and birth notices, bankruptcies, certificates and dividends, dissolutions of partnerships, literary news, and patents, as reported in the European Magazine. Includes some marriages and deaths from Ireland, Scotland and abroad, and Scottish sequestrations (bankruptcies). January to June 1822.

BOID. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Deaths, Marriages, Literary News, Bankrupts, Patents, and Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1822)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname. BT 112/7

BOID. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
London aldermen, councillors, officers and officials (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists the mayor and aldermen of the city of London, annotated with ward, year of election, and address; deputies and common-council men of the city, by ward, with the names of their respective livery companies; the city officers; officials of the Irish Society; Commissioners of Sewers, Lamps and Pavements; the Royal Exchange and Gresham Trust Committee; Gresham College; City of London School; the Commissioners of the Lieutenancy for the London; magistrates and clerks of the London police offices; and officials of the Honourable Artillery Company; and commissioners and officials of the Office of the Metropolitan Roads north of the Thames. Then, gathered together until the title of Miscellaneous Institutions, are the Metropolitan Commissioners in Lunacy; the Scottish Corporation for the Relief of Natives of Scotland who have acquired no Parochial Settlement; Morden College for Decayed Merchants; the Alfred Society; the Travellers' Society; the Grand Lodge of Freemasons of England; Royal Freemasons School; Royal Masonic Institution; Society of Ancient Britons; Royal Humane Society; Mile End Philanthropic Society; Society for the Relief of Distressed Widows; City of London General Pension Society; Society for the Discharge and Relief of Persons Imprisoned for Small Debts; Friendly Female Society for Relieving Poor, Infirm and Aged Widows and Single Women, of Good Character, who have Seen Better Days; Society of Friends of Foreigners in Distress; London Female Penitentiary; Patriotic Fund; Corporation of the Refuge for the Destitute; Society for the Improvement of Prison Discipline and for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders; Guardian Society for the Preservation of Public Morals; Society for the Suppression of Mendicity; Medical Benevolent Society; British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society; and the General Cemetery Company.

BOID. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London aldermen, councillors, officers and officials
 (1841)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.