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Boe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'boe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 24 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Lord Willoughby in the Netherlands (1580-1601)
Mrs S. C. Lomas of the Historical Manuscripts Commission prepared this calendar of the manuscripts of the Earl of Ancaster preserved at Grimsthorpe, published in 1907. The records covered are from 1550 to 1737, but the bulk of this volume is given over to an edition of the correspondence of Peregrine lord Willoughby, who was appointed governor of Bergen-op-Zoom in 1586, and spent the next ten years commanding English and Dutch forces against those of Spain. There are also a few pages (449 to 452) dealing with a scattering of ancient deeds (from c.1160 to 1547); some items from inventories (452-459, c.1522 to after 1742) and household accounts (459-482, 1560-1661) which attracted Mrs Lomas's attention; and notes from a muster roll of Baberg hundred, Suffolk, of about 1522, from which some names are given in the text.

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Lord Willoughby in the Netherlands
 (1580-1601)
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Scotland (1769)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Durham return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/57

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Masters of apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1769)
National ArchivesFrench prisoners on board H. M. S. Alexander (1798)
His Majesty's ship the Alexander took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 July to 31 August 1798: French sailors picked up by the ship after the action were given two-thirds rations until they could be put ashore in Alexandria, and so were entered in these pages.

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French prisoners on board H. M. S. Alexander
 (1798)
Masters of Merchantmen (1822)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Bk, barque; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), patent felt (P F), copper fastened (c f), copper bolted (c b), or copper repaired (C rp) sometimes with a date, such as (18)18. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1822, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repair; len. lengthened; lrp. large repair; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; Srprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; Hk., hackmetack; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel; W. O., white oak. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was American property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; a few were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; Hn, Harrington; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Mt., Maryport; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Pl., Plymouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Wo., Workington; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second) and its stores (1, first; 2, second) and the year of survey, e. g. 09 for 1809, or, if surveyed during 1821, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to masters in the main list and the supplement.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1822)
Householders of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1832)
The parliamentary election to represent Newcastle-upon-Tyne (with the townships of Benwell, Byker, Heaton, Jesmond and Westgate) took place on 13 and 14 December 1832. Under the Reform Act, the franchise was available to freeholders worth 40s a year or over; copyholders and long leaseholders of 10 or more; short leaseholders and tenants of 50 or more: but limited to adult males. This poll book lists the free burgesses and the householders separately, in each case giving full name, profession, address, and showing whether voting for sir Matthew White Ridley (R.), John Hodgson (H.) or Charles Attwood (A.). Each voter had two votes, but could opt to plump (X) for a single candidate.

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Householders of Newcastle-upon-Tyne
 (1832)
Bankrupts (1836)
Bankruptcy notices for England and Wales: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Bankrupts
 (1836)
Bankrupts (1838)
Bankruptcy notices for England and Wales: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Bankrupts
 (1838)
Bankrupts (1840)
Bankruptcy notices for England and Wales: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Bankrupts
 (1840)
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