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Bodicote Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bodicote'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons (1175-1176)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 22nd year of the reign of king Henry II, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1175 to Michaelmas 1176. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons. The large number of payments of fines for forest transgressions has been interpreted as a form of compounding for pardons by those who had rebelled during the recent years of unrest; or, looking at it in a different way, a form of extortion from the king in order to raise money to pay off the mercenaries with whose help he had quelled the rebellions. There is a separate return in each year for each shire, the name of the shire being here printed at the top of each page. Wales was still independent, in separate kingdoms, at this period, and is not included, except for 'Herefordshire in Wales'.

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons
 (1175-1176)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire (1327-1344)
The register of bishop Thomas de Charleton of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire
 (1327-1344)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1669-1679)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1718)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1718)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1741)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1741

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1741)
Military Government of London (1741)
'A General List, or Catalogue, Of all the Offices and Officers Employ'd In the several Branches of his Majesty's Government Ecclesiastical, Civil, Military, &c. In South-Britain, or England' gives the names (and often the annual salaries) of the government functionaries, civil servants, churchmen and military, systematically arranged section by section. Section 94 lists his Majesty's Commissioners of the Lieutenancy for the City of London, by Commission under the Great Seal of Great Britain, 21 June 1740.

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Military Government of London 
 (1741)
London Merchants (1767)
The Universal Pocket Companion of 1767 contained, among 'many other necessary and entertaining particulars' this directory of London merchants.

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London Merchants
 (1767)
Governors and Guardians of the Foundling Hospital, London (1768)
This list of the governors and guardians of the Hospital for the Maintenance and Education of Exposed and Deserted Young Children, incorporated by royal charter 17 October 1739, is corrected to 30 March 1768.

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Governors and Guardians of the Foundling Hospital, London
 (1768)
Unclaimed Money and Property (1866)
Gun & Co. of 17 Charlotte Street, and later of 6 Prince of Wales' Road, London, in about 1866 published this second 'List of Next of Kin & Heirs, &c., who have been Advertised for in the English, Irish, Scotch, United States of America, Canadian, Australian, East and West Indian, and other Newspapers, since 1704. Money & Property to the value of many Millions Sterling want Claimants'. The list of 4,128 names gives surname, christian name, and, occasionally, locality. Copies of the actual advertisements were furnished to enquirers by the company at a cost of six shillings.

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Unclaimed Money and Property
 (1866)
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