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Blossom Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'blossom'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 18 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Citizens of Oxford (1509-1583)
These selections from the Oxford city records were printed in 1880 under the direction of the Town Clerk. Much of the material comes from the council minutes: 24 common councillors were elected out of the citizens at large each 30 September. Apart from the general administration of the city, a large number of cases involve people brought before the Council for using improper language, or other misbehaviour. There is an almost unbroken series of hanasters, or admissions to freedom of the city, listing the names of those who by purchase, birth or apprenticeship were admitted to the guild merchant.

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Citizens of Oxford
 (1509-1583)
Middlesex Sessions (1549-1603)
This printed calendar collates a number of surviving records from Middlesex sessions for the period. Principally these are the Gaol Delivery Rolls (G. D. R.) and the General Sessions of the Peace Rolls (G. S. O. P. R.). Both series cover general criminal indictments (bills) together with the recognizances of the witnesses to attend; but the Gaol Delivery Rolls, by their very nature, tend to deal with the more serious cases - felonies where the accused could not be released on bail. The General Sessions rolls also include the sheriff's lists of bailiffs, sub-bailiffs, high and petty constables in the shire; writs of venire facias for production of jurors, writs of capias, lists of jurors, jury-panels &c. The Gaol Delivery Rolls also include coroners' inquests, writs of supersedeas, and memoranda of proclamations. Special inquiries are recorded in separate Sessions of Oyer and Terminer (S. O. T.) rolls and Inquest or Inquisition rolls (I. R.) Although coverage is good, none of the sequences of rolls for this period is complete. A peculiarity of this calendar is that in the case of actual incidents, the date given at the start of each entry is the date that the incident was alleged to have taken place (for instance, 1 June 11 Elizabeth (1569) in the sample scan) rather than the date of the court proceedings.

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Middlesex Sessions
 (1549-1603)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at York (1720-1723)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1719. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at York
 (1720-1723)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices (1767)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1767.

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Masters of Apprentices
 (1767)
Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by marriage.

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Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage
 (1392-1800)
Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by redemption.

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Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption
 (1392-1800)
Inhabitants of Liverpool (1824)
Volume I of Edward Baines's History, Directory, and Gazetteer of the County Palatine of Lancaster, published at Liverpool in 1824, includes this directory of Liverpool, which in addition extends to cover those principal inhabitants living on the Cheshire side of the Mersey.

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Inhabitants of Liverpool
 (1824)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1826)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1826)
Traders and professionals in London (1851)
The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1851)
Missionary donations from Yorkshire (1855)
The Congregational and a number of other independent churches together formed the Evangelical Alliance, committed to promoting and supporting missions to the heathen. The areas chosen for their projects were Guiana, South Africa, India, the South Seas and China. The work of the missionaries was not only in preaching the Gospel, but also in translating the Bible into local languages, and establishing churches, schools and orphanages. Orphans and native teachers were often given the names of principal contributors or congregations back in Britain. In Britain the large amounts of money needed for this work were raised among the Congregational and independent congregations, arranged by auxiliaries for each county (although some contributions for each county might in fact come in from congregations and individuals in neighbouring areas); money was gathered by ministers, at special services, by supporters, and in missionary boxes. The accounts of all these contributions were published as part of a monthly magazine called the Evangelical Magazine. Each issue of the magazine carried obituaries of prominent members of the congregations; general articles on religion; reviews of newly-published religious books; home news, mainly about meetings of importance or interest by the alliance or in individual churches; and then a separate section called the Missionary Chronicle. The Missionary Chronicle was devoted to letters and reports from the missionaries; and concludes with a set of accounts of donations towards the missionary work. This is the index to the donations reported in the magazine, January to December 1855, from Yorkshire.

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Missionary donations from Yorkshire
 (1855)
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