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Blest Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'blest'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 30 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Patent Rolls: entries for Lincolnshire (1279-1280)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 8th year of king Edward I [20 November 1279 to 19 November 1280], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Lincolnshire
 (1279-1280)
Burgesses of Preston, Lancashire, and other members of Preston guild merchant (1397-1682)
Freedom of the borough of Preston was necessary to trade in the town. The guild merchant maintained rolls of the burgesses, which were renewed every Preston guild, held every twenty years. The surviving rolls from 1397 to 1682 were edited by W. Alexander Abram, and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society in 1884 (volume ix). Each roll contains, firstly, a list of In-Burgesses, i. e., burgess inhabitants of the town, with the names of any adult sons eligible by way of inheritance to the freedom; then Foreign Burgesses (Burgenses Forinseci), i. e., those persons living outside the town who had acquired the freedom, plus the names of any adult sons; finally, there is a list of those who were not burgesses by inheritance, but had purchased freedom of the town. The only women to appear in these lists are three ladies in 1397, who were perhaps widows of burgesses. The text covers the rolls for the guilds merchant held in 1397 (20 Richard II: pages 1 to 7), 1415 (7 Henry V: 7-11), 1459 (37 Henry VI: 11-15), 1542 (34 Henry VIII: 15-19), 1562 (4 Elizabeth: 20-31), 1582 (24 Elizabeth: 31-46), 1602 (44 Elizabeth: 46-65), 1622 (20 James I: 65-94), 1642 (18 Charles I: 94-123), 1662 (14 Charles II: 123-159), and 1682 (34 Charles II: 160-202).

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Burgesses of Preston, Lancashire, and other members of Preston guild merchant
 (1397-1682)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered in Shropshire (1715-1717)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1714. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered in Shropshire
 (1715-1717)
National ArchivesApprentices (1758)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1758.

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Apprentices
 (1758)
National ArchivesApprentices and articled clerks (1764)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1764.

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Apprentices and articled clerks
 (1764)
National ArchivesApprentices (1768)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 3 December 1768.

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Apprentices
 (1768)
Inhabitants of Eccleshall in Staffordshire (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Eccleshall in Staffordshire
 (1790-1797)
Inhabitants of London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet. Private Residences'. About 10,000 people are recorded.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1805)
Railway Subscription Contracts (1845)
21,386,703 6s 4d was promised by about 10,000 subscribers of less than 2,000 per contract to the nearly 200 railway bills deposited in the Private Bill Office during the Session of Parliament for 1845. This alphabetical list gives the full names of the subscribers (surname first), description (i. e., occupation), place of abode, a numerical reference to the title of the railway, the amount subscribed to each, and total. There is a separate key to the titles of the railways.

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Railway Subscription Contracts
 (1845)
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