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Birde Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'birde'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 44 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clergy at Beverley Minster (1322-1347)
The minster (collegiate church) of St John of Beverley in Yorkshire was an important foundation with extensive ecclesiastical and temporal rights exercised by the chapter. The main register of the administration in both respects was the chapter act book, and this edition of the act book from 2 February 1322 to 19 November 1347 was edited by Arthur Francis Leach for the Surtees Society and published in 1903. The act book material occupies pages 1 to 136; to this were added extracts relating to Beverley from the registers of the Archbishops of York from 1279 to 1381; miscellaneous documents from York Minster manuscripts and the British Museum from 1135 to 1314; and a copy of the Beverley Provost's Book, compiled in 1417, but with material from the preceding centuries. All these sources are covered by this index: but the bulk of the personal references are from the chapter act book, and relate to clergy at or connected with Beverley.

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Clergy at Beverley Minster
 (1322-1347)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Barkstone Ash wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Selby, Sherburn-in-Elmet and Tadcaster.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Barkstone Ash wapentake
 (1379)
Essex Poll Tax: Gosfield (1381)
Charles Oman transcribed and edited the poll tax returns for Hinckford (Public Record Office Lay Subsidy Essex 107/68) for his study of the peasants' rising of 1381. Full lists of adults are given, township by township, grouped by status or occupation. There are returns for Alhamston & Buris (Alphamstone and Bures), Bewchamp Oton (Belchamp Otten), Bumstede ad T'rim (Steeple Bumpstead), Felstede (Felstead), Fynchyngfelde (Finchingfield), Gelham Parva (Little Yeldham), Gosfeld (Gosfield), Hythingham Sibill (Sible Hedingham), Ovyton (Ovington), Pentelowe (Pentlow), Salyng Magna (Great Saling), Stebbyng (Stebbing), and Sturmer.

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Essex Poll Tax: Gosfield
 (1381)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1458-1471)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of popes Pius II and Paul II. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1458-1471)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular (1504)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 21 September 1504 by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Eccleshall church.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular
 (1504)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular (1505)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 17 May 1505 by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

BIRDE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular
 (1505)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular (1505)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 20 September 1505 by bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Repton priory church.

BIRDE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular
 (1505)
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