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Bennes Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bennes'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Assizes on the Channel Islands (1309)
John de Fressingfeld, John de Ditton, William Russel and Drogo de Barentin, royal justices in eyre (itinerant) visited the Channel Islands in the 2nd year of the reign of king Edward II, and heard civil and criminal cases. Their assize roll was edited for the Societe Jersiaise and published in 1903, with expanded Latin text facing an English translation. There are common pleas, crown pleas, gaol delivery and quo warranto for Guernsey and Jersey (separately), as well as pleas heard on Sark, and crown pleas on Alderney.

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Assizes on the Channel Islands
 (1309)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1413-1416)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign of king Henry V (21 March 1413 to 20 March 1416) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. C. Fowler, and published in 1910. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. The commissions of the peace issued for the English towns and counties and entered on the rolls, being largely repetitive, have been consolidated in a single appendix.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1413-1416)
Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1568)
By Act of Parliament of December 1566 a subsidy of 8d in the on moveable goods and 4s in the on the annual value of land was raised from the lay (as opposed to clergy) population. These are the returns for Suffolk, printed in 1909 in the Suffolk Green Book series.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1568)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1733)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 2 August 1733

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1733)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
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