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Batie Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'batie'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners: excluded names (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. In his preface to the first volume, Burton remarked that "There might perhaps be objections to the abundance of names of persons and places unknown to fame; but it was considered that in such a work the proper names of all persons and places occurring in the Register should be preserved, to be at the service of genealogical as well as historical investigators". But by this, second, volume, he decided that complete coverage was impractical, with "the crowding in of proper names, all but a few being the names of obscure persons ... Borderers are called up in considerable groups, and ordered to find, or recorded as having found, sureties for giving compensation to persons plundered, or for good conduct for the future. Several burgesses are sometimes entered in a minute about a Corporation quarrel. When the particulars of unimportant private litigations are omitted, the names remain." He therefore devised this 'Index of Names excluded from the Text', giving name, conditions, and date in register.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners: excluded names
 (1569-1578)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1610-1613)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1726)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 31 December 1726

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1726)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Scotland (1797)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/68

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Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1797)
Bankrupts (1786-1806)
William Smith's abstracts of bankrupts, dividends and certificates for England and Wales from 1786 to June 1806. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.

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Bankrupts
 (1786-1806)
Bankrupts (1806-1807)
William Smith's abstracts of bankruptcy certificates and dividends for England and Wales from July 1806 to December 1807. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.

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Bankrupts
 (1806-1807)
Bankrupts: Dividends and Certificates (1807-1810)
William Smith's abstracts of bankruptcy certificates and dividends for England and Wales from December 1807 to 1810, referring to commissions taken out before December 1807. Each entry gives the year of the commission; the full name of the bankrupt, address, occupation, and the dates of dividends and certificate as appropriate.

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Bankrupts: Dividends and Certificates
 (1807-1810)
South County Durham Poll Book: Bishop Auckland District (1832)
A poll for two Knights of the Shire to represent in Parliament the Southern Division of the county palatine of Durham was taken on 21 and 22 December 1832. This poll book sets out all the electors by polling district (Barnard Castle, Bishop Auckland, Darlington, Middleton-in-Teesdale, Sedgefield, Stanhope and Stockton) and gives registered number; full name (surname first); place of abode; nature of qualification (such as House as occupier, Land as occupier, Copyhold Property, &c.); and the name of the parish, township or place where the property is situate. The votes are set out in the right-hand columns, under P. (for Joseph Pearse, jun., esq.), B. (John Bowes, esq.), and S. (Robert Duncombe Shafto, esq.), the three candidates. A voter could choose two candidates, in which case a dash is put in each of the two appropriate columns, or plump for just one - where a star is placed in that candidate's column. This was the first election after the Reform Act, which extended the franchise in the counties to all adult men possessing freehold worth 40s a year or more, or copyhold or long leasehold of 10 or more, or being tenants or short leaseholders of 50 or more.

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South County Durham Poll Book: Bishop Auckland District
 (1832)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
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