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Barnton Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'barnton'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Close Rolls (1302-1307)
The close rolls of the 31st to 35th years of the reign of king Edward I, that is to the day of his death (7 July 1307), record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. In amongst this official material, the rolls were also used as a way of recording many acknowledgments of private debts and contracts between individuals. Most of the contents relate to England, but there are also entries concerning Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1302-1307)
Close Rolls (1343-1346)
The close rolls of the 17th, 18th and 19th years of the reign of king Edward III record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1343-1346)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1360-1369)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 33rd to the 43rd years of king Edward III.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1360-1369)
London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1361-1374)
Ordinations to first tonsure, acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop Simon de Sudbury of London. London diocese covered Middlesex, Essex and part of Hertfordshire; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars ('religious') are listed separately, and the lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests are also separated into beneficed and not beneficed (or 'not promoted'). The acolyte lists are unusual in giving a parish or diocese of origin.

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London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1361-1374)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1298-1389)
'Cambridge Gild Records' was edited by Mary Bateson for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, and printed in 1903. Several important records for the town are brought together: minutes of the Gild of St Mary in the church of St Mary in the Market Place, 1298-1319 (pages 1-13); bede rolls of the same of around 1349 (14-25); minutes of the Gild of Corpus Christi in the church of St Bene't (26-62); returns for all the Cambridge gilds in 1389 (63-128); a calendar of deeds connected with the gilds of St Mary and Corpus Christi (129-150); and also a subsidy roll for the borough, listing householders in the 8th year of king Edward II (1314-1315) (151-157). The gild minutes include lists of persons entering the gild, usually paying a certain amount for alms and for wax for lights (candles). The bede rolls list prayers for the souls of the deceased, using the formula 'pro anima ..... (et ..... uxoris ejus)', 'for the soul of ..... (and of ..... his wife)'. Dates are not generally given, but most of the entries in these bede rolls are from 1349 to 1352.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1298-1389)
Landowners and tenants in Cambridgeshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Cambridgeshire
 (1345-1485)
Landowners and tenants in Essex (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Essex
 (1345-1485)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1616-1624)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1616-1624)
Electors of Great Yarmouth (1840)
The register of electors entitled to vote in any parliamentary election for East Norfolk between 1 November 1840 and 1 November 1841 lists 8,556 freeholders arranged by hundred and within hundred by parish or township &c. In the first column, after number within the register, the elector's name is given (surname first); the second column gives place of abode; the third column the nature of qualification (such as 'owner and occupier'); and the fourth column the address of the qualifying property, in some cases with the name of the tenant or occupier.

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Electors of Great Yarmouth
 (1840)
Officers of the British Army (1860)
The New Annual Army List first lists officers of the rank of major and above, by rank, and with dates of appointment to each successive higher rank, and (where appropriate) when placed on half pay. An asterisk indicates temporary rank; a superscript p shows that a commission was purchased; a dagger shows officers on the half pay of their last regimental commission. An ornate W indicates those officers actually present in any of the actions of 16, 17 or 18 June 1815 and therefore awarded the Waterloo Medal; P is put before the name of an officer who served in the Peninsula or the South of France; T for the Battle of Trafalgar; VC for the Victoria Cross. For each officer in this section, the final column notes his then present or immediately former regiment and/or office, if any. Next, all the officers of the army are listed, down to the rank of ensign, by regiment or corps, giving rank, name, date of rank in the regiment, and date of rank in the army, with occasional further notes. Again, holders of medals are duly noted, as in the first list. For each regiment the paymaster, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon and assistant surgeons are named, as well as the civilian agent; and the regimental motto, battle honours, and colours of the facings and lace of the dress uniform are stated. After the British regiments of the line, the Rifle Brigade, the officers of the West India infantry, the Ceylon rifles, the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the Royal Canadian Rifles, St Helena Regiment and the Gold Coast Artillery Corps are given; then the officers of the garrisons and other military establishments; the Royal Artillery; Royal Engineers; Royal Marines; Commissariat Department; Medical Department; Staff Officers of Pensioners; Chaplains' Department; Staff (of Great Britain, Australia, Bahamas, Bermuda, British Columbia, Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, East Indies, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Heligoland, Hong Kong, Ionian Islands, Jamaica (including Honduras), Malta, Mauritius, Newfoundland, North America, St Helena, the Western Coast of Africa, and the Windward and Leeward Islands); Military and Civil Department; and Barrack Masters. Then there is a separate list of officers retained on retired full pay and half pay (including the German Legion, the Brunswick Cavalry, the Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Brittaniques, Royal Corsican Rangers, the Greek Light Infantry, Royal Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, the York Light Infantry Volunteers, Foreign Veteran Battalion and the Foreign Corps of Waggoners).

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Officers of the British Army
 (1860)
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