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Baren Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'baren'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire (1297)
Taxation roll of the lay (non-clergy) inhabitants of Yorkshire from the 25th year of the reign of king Edward I. Latin

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire
 (1297)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular (1509)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 2 June 1509, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Secular
 (1509)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1575-1577)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1575-1577)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Suffolk (1776)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/59

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Masters of apprentices registered in Suffolk
 (1776)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1840)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. This section of the register (BT 112/2) covers numbers 1 to 2952 and 20200 to 23034, 5786 different entries, of men whose surnames began with the letters Ba. During 1840 this series of ledgers was abandoned, and a new set started with names grouped together by surname.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1840)
Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851)
The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for November 1851. (The sample scan is from February)

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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers
 (1851)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1880)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, January to March 1880

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1880)
Imperial Service Medal (1942)
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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Imperial Service Medal
 (1942)
Residents of Harrogate (1957)
Kelly's Directory of Harrogate has this list of private residents, covering Harrogate, Bilton, Pannal (P), Pannal Ash (P A) and Starbeck (S). Telephone numbers (with a symbol representing a dangling mouthpiece) are given wherever appropriate. Men are generally listed with their christian name, but women as Miss or Mrs with an initial.

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Residents of Harrogate
 (1957)
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