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Bareford Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'bareford'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
Surrey Sessions (1659-1661)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from Midsummer 1659 to Midsummer 1661, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for Easter and Midsummer 1661.

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Surrey Sessions
 (1659-1661)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Inhabitants of Kensington in Middlesex (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Kensington in Middlesex
 (1790-1797)
British Civil Servants (1940)
The British Imperial Calendar lists civil servants in Britain, arranged according to the organizational structure of the state, and shows their qualifications and salaries.

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British Civil Servants
 (1940)
Chartered Electrical Engineers (M. I. E. E. and A. M. I. E. E.) (1951)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. This list of members, corrected to 2 July 1951, gives the names and addresses of the Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.), all of whom were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining the grade of Associate Member (AM) or Member (M); and, before the address, the year of reaching each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931), G standing for Graduate, S for Student. Where the engineer was also a member of one of the institution's specialized sections, this abbreviation is given, in bold: M, Measurements Section; R, Radio Section; S, Supply Section; U, Utilization Section.

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Chartered Electrical Engineers (M. I. E. E. and A. M. I. E. E.)
 (1951)
Telephone subscribers in Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, and parts of Norfolk, Essex and Suffolk (1958)
The Post Office Telephone Directory for the Cambridge area for June 1958 lists subscribers from Bishop's Stortford (Hertfordshire), Brandon (Suffolk), Buntingford (Hertfordshire), Bury St Edmunds (Suffolk), Cambridge, Downham Market (Norfolk), Dunmow (Essex), Ely (Cambridgeshire), Epping (Essex), Fakenham (Norfolk), Great Dunmow (Essex), Harleston (Norfolk), Harlow (Essex), Haverhill (Suffolk), Hertford, Hunstanton (Norfolk), King's Lynn (Norfolk), Much Hadham (Hertfordshire), Newmarket (Suffolk), Ongar (Essex), Royston (Hertfordshire), Saffron Walden (Essex), Sandringham (Norfolk), Sawbridgeworth (Hertfordshire), Stansted (Essex), Swaffham (Norfolk), Thetford (Norfolk), Walsingham (Norfolk), Ware (Hertfordshire), Wells-next-the-Sea (Norfolk), and the surrounding countryside.

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Telephone subscribers in Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, and parts of Norfolk, Essex and Suffolk
 (1958)
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