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Backway Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'backway'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 15 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Somerset (1625-1639)
The Reverend E. H. Bates Harbin prepared extracts from the Somerset quarter session records of 1625 to 1639 for publication by the Somerset Record Society (xxiv) in 1908. The period is covered by quarter sessions minute book 2 (part) and 3; these are based on the rolls of recognizances; criminal indictments; and the sessions rolls (which also supplied a hiatus in book 2 for most of 1627).

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Inhabitants of Somerset
 (1625-1639)
Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors (1673-1692)
The only surviving complete volume of the records of the courts held by the Governor and Assistants of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay is for the period 1673 to 1692. It was transcribed by John Noble, and published by order of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston, New England, as County Commissioners of the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. Under English law overseas colonies were generally deemed to fall under the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, and were subject to English law varied by local circumstances. These Courts of Assistants therefore also function as Courts of Admiralty; the courts had jurisiction over criminal cases and also in civil disputes between parties. In practice, many of the names that occur in the record are just those of the members of the grand jury and the lesser juries (appointed from among the adult male householders of the colony) before whom the cases were tried.

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Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors
 (1673-1692)
House of Lords Proceedings (1692-1693)
Private bills dealing with divorce, disputed and entailed estates: petitions, reports and commissions: naturalisation proceedings.

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House of Lords Proceedings
 (1692-1693)
National ArchivesClerks and apprentices (1784)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1784. IR 1/32

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Clerks and apprentices
 (1784)
National ArchivesClerks and apprentices (1787)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1787. IR 1/33

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Clerks and apprentices
 (1787)
National ArchivesApprentices and clerks (1789)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1789. IR 1/34

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Apprentices and clerks
 (1789)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1826)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1826)
London and Middlesex crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: victims and witnesses (1836)
Henry Buckler copied in shorthand the proceedings of trials at the Central Criminal Court in London, and his transcripts were printed. This volume (iii), from 1836, covers sessions i to vi of the Copeland mayoralty of 1835 to 1836. The bulk of the cases were from London and Middlesex, with separate sections for Essex, Kent and Surrey, but, preceding all these, Capital Convictions. The names of the accused are annotated with an asterisk to show if they had previously been in custody; an obelisk indicates a known associate of bad characters. Most cases resulted in a guilty verdict, and a large proportion of these led to a sentence of transportation to Australia. This index covers the victims, witnesses (including constables) and others incidentally named in the London and Middlesex cases of April 1836.

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London and Middlesex crimes tried at the Central Criminal Court: victims and witnesses
 (1836)
Traders and professionals in London (1851)
The Post Office London Directory for 1851 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording about 80,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1851)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Greenwich (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Greenwich
 (1861)
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