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Ashfordby Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'ashfordby'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Hastings family deeds (1100-1600)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which is the first volume, published in 1928, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli. This volume covers four categories of the records: the Ancient Deeds; Manorial and other Documents; Accounts and Inventories; and Miscellaneous Papers. Most, but not all, of the material is mediaeval. About half of the deeds relate to the family property in Leicestershire; then there are sections for Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire, Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Yorkshire, Northumberland, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, London, Wiltshire, Somersetshire, Devonshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, &c. The manorial section includes a partitions of the estates of the Earls of Leicester and Wilton about 1204 and 1277; manor court rolls are mentioned, but not extracted. Choicer items from the family accounts and inventories are copied in extenso for 1596 and 1607, and thereafter summarised. Most of the later material is merely dipped into for curiosities.

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Hastings family deeds
 (1100-1600)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Inhabitants of Hertfordshire (1723)
An Act of Parliament of 9 George I required all men aged 18 and over who had not done so previously to swear allegiance. From 17 August to 24 December 1723 the greater part of the men of Hertfordshire attended at various inns in the county to sign the oath of allegiance: women were exempt from the act, but almost as many attended and swore. This list indicates the place of attestation by letters A., B., C., &c., for which there is a key, scans of which are included with the main scan for the surname.

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Inhabitants of Hertfordshire
 (1723)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1741)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1741

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1741)
Hertfordshire Loyalists (1745)
This list of the members of the Rebellion Association, 'an association of the noblemen, gentlemen, clergy, freeholders and inhabitants of the county of Hertford', preserved among the Hertfordshire sessions records, also records the amounts of each individual's subscription or voluntary donation to the cause of maintaining the Church and Crown of England.

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Hertfordshire Loyalists
 (1745)
Members of the Society for the Encouragement of Arts &c. (1766)
A List of the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce, 18 August 1766.

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Members of the Society for the Encouragement of Arts &c.
 (1766)
Petitioners for a new Shire Hall for Hertford (1768)
Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. Appendix II is a list of signatories to a petition to Parliament for leave to bring in a bill for building the new Shire Hall.

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Petitioners for a new Shire Hall for Hertford
 (1768)
Hertfordshire Communicants (1761-1795)
Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. Appendix V is a list of Sacrament Certificates: under the Test Act of 1673, holders of public offices were required to produce a certificate that they had taken communion in a parish church. For each such communicant the list gives full name (surname first); date of taking communion; name of the church; name of the minister; name of the churchwarden(s); and names of two witnesses.

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Hertfordshire Communicants
 (1761-1795)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1752-1799)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the most cases (362) concerned assaults and rioting, and larceny (378), but there is a large variety of other matter, as extensive as the jurisdiction of the courts. These highly condensed abstracts of the entries were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1752-1799)
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